Acquired Angioedema

Common Name(s)

Acquired Angioedema

Acquired angioedema (AAE) is a rare condition characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling (edema). Affected people may have swelling of the face, lips, tongue, limbs, and genitals. Sometimes there is abdominal pain due to edema of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and life-threatening edema of the upper respiratory tract. Swelling episodes may be triggered by mild trauma (e.g., dental work), viral illness, cold exposure, pregnancy, ingestion of certain foods, or emotional stress.  There are two forms of AAE: type I and type II. AAE type I is most commonly associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and consumption of C1-INH.  AAE type II is an autoimmune condition associated with the presence of an autoantibody against C1-INH. Treatment aims to control episodes and normalize C1-INH levels.  When possible, the underlying disorder should be treated.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acquired Angioedema" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acquired Angioedema" returned 21 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Non-myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a new treatment option for acquired angioedema?
 

Author(s): I H A Zegers, K N A Aaldering, C M G Nieuwhof, H C Schouten

Journal: Neth J Med. 2015 Oct;73(8):383-5.

 

Acquired angioedema is a rare disorder causing recurrent life-threatening angioedema, due to decreased activity of C1 esterase inhibitor.

Last Updated: 19 Oct 2015

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Successful rituximab B lymphocyte depletion therapy for angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor protein deficiency: association with reduced C1 inhibitor protein autoantibody titers.
 

Author(s): David H Dreyfus, Chang Rim Na, Christopher C Randolph, Denise Kearney, Christina Price, David Podell

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2014 May;16(5):315-6.

 

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2014

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New perspectives in acquired angioedema.
 

Author(s): Shmuel Kivity

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2014 May;16(5):313-4.

 

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acquired Angioedema" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

International consensus on hereditary and acquired angioedema.
 

Author(s): David M Lang, Werner Aberer, Jonathan A Bernstein, Hiok Hee Chng, Anete Sevciovic Grumach, Michihiro Hide, Marcus Maurer, Richard Weber, Bruce Zuraw

Journal: Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol.. 2012 Dec;109(6):395-402.

 

Last Updated: 26 Nov 2012

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Acquired angioedema responding to rituximab.
 

Author(s): Amr Hassan, Stéphanie Amarger, Arlette Tridon, Denise Ponard, Pierre Souteyrand, Michel D'Incan

Journal: Acta Derm. Venereol.. 2011 Oct;91(6):733-4.

 

Last Updated: 26 Oct 2011

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[Profhylaxis and treatment of hereditary and acquired angioedema at HUB; use of the C1-esterase inhibitor].
 

Author(s): L Pastó Cardona, J Bordas Orpinell, G Mercadal Orfila, A Pérez de la Vara, R Jódar Massanés

Journal: Farm Hosp. ;27(6):346-52.

 

Hereditary and acquired angioedema result from a deficiency in first complement component esterase (C1-esterase) inhibitor. It is characterized by transient subcutaneous tissue, intestinal wall, and upper airway swelling, which may lead to asphyxia and death. The pathophysiology, ...

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2004

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Biomarker for Hereditary Angioedema Disease Type 1
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Hereditary AngioEdema; Angioedema, Hereditary; Angio-Oedema of Lips; Angio-Oedema of Tongue

 

Last Updated: 23 Jan 2017

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