Acute Mountain Sickness

Common Name(s)

Acute Mountain Sickness

Acute mountain sickness is an illness caused by reduced air pressure and lower oxygen levels at high altitudes (usually above 8,000 feet or 2,400 meters). People at higher risk for acute mountain sickness are those who live at or near sea level and travel to a high altitude, or people who have had the illness before. The faster one climbs to a higher altitude, the more likely acute mountain sickness will occur. Signs and symptoms depend on the speed of ascension and the level of exertion, and can range from mild to life-threatening. Mild to moderate symptoms include difficulty sleeping, dizziness or light-headedness, fatigue, headache, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, rapid pulse, and shortness of breath with exertion. Symptoms of more severe acute mountain sickness include blue color to the skin, chest tightness or congestion, confusion, cough, coughing up blood, decreased consciousness, gray or pale complexion, cannot walk in a straight line or walk at all, shortness of breath at rest, and death due to lung problems or brain swelling.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acute Mountain Sickness" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 119 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The effects of respiratory inhaled drugs on the prevention of acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Xiaomei Wang, Hong Chen, Rong Li, Weiling Fu, Chunyan Yao

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Aug;97(32):e11788.

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is common in high-altitude travelers, and may lead to life-threatening high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). The inhaled drugs have a much lower peak serum concentrations and a shorter half-life period than oral ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Incidence and severity of acute mountain sickness and associated symptoms in children trekking on Xue Mountain, Taiwan.
 

Author(s): Fei-Ying Cheng, Mei-Jy Jeng, Yin-Chou Lin, Shih-Hao Wang, Shih-Hao Wu, Wen-Cheng Li, Kuo-Feng Huang, Te-Fa Chiu

Journal:

 

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) occurs in non-acclimatized people after an acute ascent to an altitude of 2,500 m or higher. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and severity of AMS and associated symptoms in children.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Acute mountain sickness, arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate among Tibetan students who reascend to Lhasa after 7 years at low altitude: a prospective cohort study.
 

Author(s): Gonggalanzi, Labasangzhu, Espen Bjertness, Tianyi Wu, Hein Stigum, Per Nafstad

Journal:

 

The aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and address the changes in arterial oxygen saturation (SaO) and heart rate (HR) in native Tibetans who reascend to the high-altitude city of Lhasa (3658 m) after a 7-year stay at low altitude.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acute Mountain Sickness" returned 15 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Relationship between Smoking and Acute Mountain Sickness: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.
 

Author(s): Cristina Masuet-Aumatell, Alba Sánchez-Mascuñano, Fernando Agüero Santangelo, Sergio Morchón Ramos, Josep Maria Ramon-Torrell

Journal: Biomed Res Int. 2017 ;2017():1409656.

 

Previous epidemiological investigations of the relationship between smoking and acute mountain sickness (AMS) risk yielded inconsistent findings. Therefore, a meta-analysis of observational studies was performed to determine whether smoking is related to the development of AMS.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Pharmacology of acute mountain sickness: old drugs and newer thinking.
 

Author(s): Erik R Swenson

Journal: J. Appl. Physiol.. 2016 Jan;120(2):204-15.

 

Pharmacotherapy in acute mountain sickness (AMS) for the past half century has largely rested on the use of carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, and corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone. The benefits of CA inhibitors are thought to arise from their known ventilatory ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Pro: pulse oximetry is useful in predicting acute mountain sickness.
 

Author(s): Buddha Basnyat

Journal: High Alt. Med. Biol.. 2014 Dec;15(4):440-1.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

T89 in Prevention and Treatment of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) During Rapid Ascent
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness

 

Last Updated: 3 Aug 2018

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Safety and Efficacy of T89 in Prevention and Treatment of Adults With Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS)

 

Last Updated: 16 Aug 2018

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Effect of Acetazolamide on Acute Mountain Sickness in Lowlanders Older Than 40 Years
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acute Mountain Sickness

 

Last Updated: 18 Jun 2018

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