Adie Syndrome

Common Name(s)

Adie Syndrome

Adie syndrome is is a neurological disorder affecting the pupil of the eye and the autonomic nervous system.  It is characterized by one eye with a pupil that is larger than normal that constricts slowly in bright light (tonic pupil), along with the absence of deep tendon reflexes, usually in the Achilles tendon. Adie syndrome may be the result of a viral or bacterial infection that causes inflammation and damage to neurons in the ciliary ganglion, an area of the brain that controls eye movements, and the spinal ganglion, an area of the brain involved in the response of the autonomic nervous system. Most cases of Adie Syndrome are not progressive, life threatening, or disabling.   
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Adie Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Adie Syndrome" returned 20 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

William John Adie: the man behind the syndrome.
 

Author(s): Aazim A Siddiqui, Jonathan C Clarke, Andrzej Grzybowski

Journal: Clin. Experiment. Ophthalmol.. 2014 Nov;42(8):778-84.

 

William John Adie was an Australian neurologist in the early 20th century responsible for extensively describing the tonically dilated pupil associated with absent deep tendon reflexes - both features of a syndrome that now bears his name. In addition to other neurological syndromes, ...

Last Updated: 27 Oct 2014

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Teaching video neuroimages: acute Adie syndrome.
 

Author(s): Benjamin R Wakerley, Mei Hong Tan, Martin R Turner

Journal: Neurology. 2012 Sep;79(11):e97.

 

Last Updated: 11 Sep 2012

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[Adie syndrome and chronic nephropathy].
 

Author(s): N Ruiz-Del Río, S Rodríguez-Prado, E Martínez-Ormaechea, J C González García-Sobrón, P Miranda-Lloret

Journal: Rev Neurol. ;48(2):111.

 

Last Updated: 28 Jan 2009

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Adie Syndrome" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.