Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome

Common Name(s)

Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome

Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a disorder typically seen in children, but in adult OMS symptoms do not appear until later in life. The disease is extremely rare, affecting only 1 in 10,000,000 people per year. The cause is unknown. Symptoms include rapid uncontrolled eye movements (opsoclonus), challenges speaking or understanding others, difficulty sleeping, irritability, and muscle twitches. Typically with adult onset OMS, symptoms are less severe or debilitating than those of the childhood disorder. The disorder can be managed with various medications, but there is no definite cure for OMS.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

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Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network, Inc.

The Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network recognizes the immediate need of Opsoclonus Myoclonus patients and their families to network with others affected by the syndrome, to have access to comprehensive information relating to the syndrome, and to be informed of the latest research, and recognizes the immediate need to have medical professionals better informed about the syndrome, its symptoms, history, etiology, and treatments. The Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network believes the syndrome's causes are discernible, and therefore advocates and supports research investigating the syndrome's neuro-biological and biochemical basis. Any person affected by the syndrome is considered a community member.

Last Updated: 19 Dec 2011

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network, Inc.

The Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network recognizes the immediate need of Opsoclonus Myoclonus patients and their families to network with others affected by the syndrome, to have access to comprehensive information relating to the syndrome, and to be informed of the latest research, and recognizes the immediate need to have medical professionals better informed about the syndrome, its symptoms, history, etiology, and treatments. The Opsoclonus Myoclonus Support Network believes the syndrome's causes are discernible, and therefore advocates and supports research investigating the syndrome's neuro-biological and biochemical basis. Any person affected by the syndrome is considered a community member.

Last Updated: 19 Dec 2011

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome" returned 3 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with a nasopharyngeal tumor in an adult: a case report.
 

Author(s): Bilal Gani Taib, Andrew J Kinshuck, Philip Milburn-McNulty, Lauren Fratalia, Leigh Forsyth, David Husband, Terry M Jones, Anu Jacob

Journal:

 

Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare autoimmune syndrome usually seen in children and very rarely in adults. It typically presents with a triad of opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia, and is most often associated with a tumor or after an infection or vaccination. Around half of all ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Adult paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome associated with antimitochondrial autoantibodies.
 

Author(s): F Blaes, M Jauss, J Kraus, P Oschmann, I Krasenbrink, M Kaps, B Teegen

Journal: J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry. 2003 Nov;74(11):1595-6.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Opsoclonus--myoclonus syndrome in an adult: a case report and response to clonazepam.
 

Author(s): R K Garg, A M Kar, V Dixit

Journal: Indian J Ophthalmol. 1996 Jun;44(2):101-2.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Adult Opsoclonus Myoclonus Syndrome" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.