Argentine hemorrhagic fever

Common Name(s)

Argentine hemorrhagic fever

Argentine hemorrhagic fever is caused by the Junin virus and is endemic (continuously present) in Argentina. The virus was first reported in Buenos Aires in 1958 and since then there have been 23 reported outbreaks of the virus. The virus is spread by asymptomatic (no signs or symptoms) corn mice when particles from its urine or saliva get into the air and are inhaled by humans. The disease may then spread from person-to-person through contact with infected body fluids and tissues.

The incubation period (time from exposure to virus to first symptoms) can range from 5 to 14 days. Symptoms of the virus may include chills, fever, headache, dizziness, chest pain, back pain, abdominal pain, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and a general feeling of malaise (tiredness and feelings of not being well, being uncomfortable and weak). As the disease progresses, the person may develop a high fever, dehydration, hypotension, flushed skin, abnormally slow heartbeat, or bleeding from the gums and internal tissues.

Diagnosis of Argentine hemorrhagic fever may involve examining medical and travel history as well as laboratory tests to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment may include hydration, rest, warmth, and adequate nutrition. Supportive therapy and antiviral drugs may also help prevent complications. A vaccine for the virus became available in 1990 and is therefore a method of prevention for contracting the virus. Prevention of the virus can also involve guarding against rodents including keeping food covered, disposing of garbage and mowing grass regularly. Talk with a physician before traveling to Argentina or another developing country to ensure that you are up to date on the recommended vaccinations and are aware of preventative measures. If you or a family member has been diagnosed with Argentine hemorrhagic fever, talk with your doctor about the most current treatment options and what you can do to avoid spreading the infection to others.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Argentine hemorrhagic fever" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Argentine hemorrhagic fever" returned 6 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Absence of an N-Linked Glycosylation Motif in the Glycoprotein of the Live-Attenuated Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Vaccine, Candid #1, Results in Its Improper Processing, and Reduced Surface Expression.
 

Author(s): John T Manning, Alexey V Seregin, Nadezhda E Yun, Takaaki Koma, Cheng Huang, José Barral, Juan C de la Torre, Slobodan Paessler

Journal:

 

Junin virus (JUNV), a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus, is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The live-attenuated Candid #1 (Can) strain currently serves as a vaccine for at-risk populations. We have previously shown that the Can glycoprotein (GPC) gene ...

Last Updated: 21 Feb 2017

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[New transmission scenarios of the Argentine hemorrhagic fever since the introduction of the live attenuated junin virus vaccine (Candid #1): an experience in migrant workers].
 

Author(s): Ana Briggiler, Anabel Sinchi, Florencia Coronel, Zaida Sánchez, Silvana Levis, Jorge Taylor, Delia Enria

Journal: Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica. ;32(1):165-71.

 

The Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is a severe acute viral disease caused by the Junin virus of the Arenaviridae family. The AHF endemic area coincides geographically with the largest grain export agro-industrial complex of the country [Argentina]. Since the implementation of vaccination ...

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2015

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[Quali-quantitative study of the social variables defining transmission scenarios of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever in the provinces of Buenos Aires and Santa Fe, 2001-2010].
 

Author(s): Andrea Mastrangelo, Paula Tagliabue, Lorena Berro, Darío De Carolis, Anabel Sinchi, Clara Digilio, Delia Enria

Journal: Salud Colect. 2014 Aug;10(2):171-84.

 

The aim of this paper was to characterize transmission scenarios of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever in the post-vaccination period (2001-2010). The study was made up of three phases. The first consisted of a quantitative analysis using the database of the Dr. Julio I. Maiztegui National ...

Last Updated: 20 Sep 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Argentine hemorrhagic fever" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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