Athlete's foot

Common Name(s)

Athlete's foot, Tinea pedis

Athlete’s foot, also called tinea pedis, is a fungal infection that typically starts in the areas between the toes. It is often seen in people who have sweaty feet that are kept in tight fitting shoes and is caused by the same fungus that causes ringworm and jock itch. The condition is contagious and can be spread by making contact with an infected person, using an infected towel, or by walking on an infected surface. The infection can spread from the feet to the hands or groin.

Athlete’s foot usually starts with a scaly red rash in between the toes. The affected area will usually itch at night when socks and shoes are removed. The skin on the affected foot will become dry and can often be mistaken for eczema. Some forms of athlete’s foot can cause blisters on the skin. Risk factors for athletes foot include gender (men get it more often than women), wearing tight shoes, sharing clothes or shoes with someone with a fungal infection, walking barefoot in public areas, and having a weak immune system.

Your doctor can usually diagnose athlete’s foot by looking at the affected area. Evaluating a small sample from the infected area may be needed to confirm the diagnosis. Most cases of athlete’s foot can be treated with over-the-counter anti-fungal sprays, creams, powders and lotions. If the infection does not respond to the over-the-counter treatments, your doctor may prescribe a stronger option. Some cases require anti-fungal pills that are taken by mouth. If you have been diagnosed with athlete’s foot, talk to your doctor to discuss the treatment option that is best for you.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Athlete's foot" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Athlete's foot" returned 6 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[What agents incriminated in athlete's foot? Survey of consulting diabetic patients in CHU Mohammed VI Marrakech].
 

Author(s): Hakima Chegour, Nawal El Ansari, Ghizlane El Mghari, Abdelali Tali, Laila Zoughaghi, Majda Sebbani, Mohamed Amine

Journal:

 

Last Updated: 29 Aug 2014

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A surgeon's or an athlete's foot.
 

Author(s): Richard M Pinder, Anna Ikponmwosa

Journal: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2006 Nov;88(7):692.

 

Last Updated: 29 Nov 2006

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Athlete's foot and fungally infected toenails. Authors should use familiar drug names.
 

Author(s): A Melville

Journal: BMJ. 2001 May;322(7297):1306-7.

 

Last Updated: 12 Jun 2001

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Athlete's foot" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Athlete's foot.
 

Author(s): Fay Crawford

Journal:

 

Around 15% to 25% of people are likely to have athlete's foot at any one time. The infection can spread to other parts of the body and to other people.

Last Updated: 23 Jun 2011

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[How I treat ... the athlete's foot and its non-mycotic cutaneous pathology].
 

Author(s): V Goffin, R Bourguignon, A L Fraiture, G E Piérard

Journal: Rev Med Liege. 2002 Oct;57(10):630-6.

 

Skin and nails of the foot of sport practitioners of various disciplines are subjected to the effects of benign but invalidating pathologies. Microtraumatisms are frequently involved. Beside dermatomycoses and onychomycoses, a dozen of typical disorders are identified.

Last Updated: 16 Dec 2002

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Nitric Oxide Releasing Solution (NORS) Footbath to Treat Athlete's Foot
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Tinea Pedis

 

Last Updated: 12 Aug 2016

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Glucosamine Sulphate and Ginkgo Biloba as Antifungal Activity for Treating Tinea Pedis
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Foot Infection Tinea Pedis

 

Last Updated: 26 Aug 2016

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Non-inferiority Trial of Dapaconazole Versus Ketoconazole
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Tinea Pedis

 

Last Updated: 22 Oct 2017

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