Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects

Common Name(s)

Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects

Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects (ASD-AV) is a heart defect present at birth (congenital). An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a hole in the septum (wall) separating the two upper chambers of the heart (atrium). This septum separates the oxygen rich blood (which will be pumped into the body) from the oxygen poor blood (which is returning from the body). The holes are actually normal during fetal development, but should close before a baby is born. The ASD allows the blood to go to the wrong side of the heart, making the heart work much harder than it should. The other part of the condition (AV), atrioventricular conduction, refers to the heart’s electrical system which controls the heart rate. The AV node is responsible for transferring the electrical messages from the atrium to the ventricles so that each chamber contracts at the correct time.

Symptoms do not always present in children and may become more noticeable with age. The ASD-AV may cause difficulty breathing, irregular heartbeats (bradycardia), and poor blood circulation, which can cause swelling in the legs (edema) and bluish lips or skin. The cause is likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Several families however are known to have a mutation (change) in the NKX2-5 gene, but changes in this gene may also cause different birth defects.

In order to diagnose an ASD, your doctor will perform a physical exam. Other imaging tests may include MRIs, CT scans, and ultrasounds. The AV conduction defect will be confirmed by an electrocardiogram and possibly other tests which can monitor heart rhythm. The most common treatment is surgery to repair the hole and using a pacemaker to control the heart rate. Talk to your cardiologist about the most current treatment options. Genetic counselors and support groups are also good sources of information and can help connect you with others affected by ASD-AV defects.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects" returned 0 free, full-text research articles on human participants.

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Atrial septal defect with atrioventricular conduction defects" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.