Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2

Common Name(s)

Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome 2 (aHUS 2) is a rare genetic disease in which red blood cells are abnormally destroyed, leading to a decreased red blood cell count (anemia) and destruction of the platelets (thrombocytopenia). Platelets are found circulating in the blood and are involved in clot formation to stop bleeding. aHUS 2 is a chronic and often progressive condition. This particular type of aHUS is caused by a mutation or change in the MCP gene. This gene makes proteins that help regulate the complement system, which is a part of the immune system that helps to get rid of things that may be harmful to the body.

Early symptoms of aHUS 2 include malaise, tiredness, lethargy, and irritability. Later, individuals usually develop swelling, blood in the urine, protein in the urine, and a reduced amount of albumin in the blood. Albumin is a major protein in blood that helps to regulate blood pressure and transport proteins and other substances. The debris from destroyed red blood cells in aHUS 2 can clog or damage the tiny blood vessels in the kidney, which is the organ that filters blood and produces urine. Kidney failure may occur and is a feared complication of this condition.

aHUS 2 is often diagnosed based on family history, genetic testing, and signs of a low red blood cell count (anemia), a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia), and kidney damage. In general, aHUS 2 has a better prognosis than other types of aHUS. Treatment may include IV fluid and nutrient replacement, blood transfusions, and medication to help maintain blood pressure. If the kidneys stop working, then dialysis may be needed in order to filter the blood. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with aHUS 2, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options. In addition, a genetic counselor can help discuss inheritance and risks to other family members.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Efficacy and safety of eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome from 2-year extensions of phase 2 studies.
 

Author(s): Christoph Licht, Larry A Greenbaum, Petra Muus, Sunil Babu, Camille L Bedrosian, David J Cohen, Yahsou Delmas, Kenneth Douglas, Richard R Furman, Osama A Gaber, Timothy Goodship, Maria Herthelius, Maryvonne Hourmant, Christophe M Legendre, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Neil Sheerin, Antonella Trivelli, Chantal Loirat

Journal: Kidney Int.. 2015 May;87(5):1061-73.

 

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, possibly life-threatening disease characterized by platelet activation, hemolysis and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) leading to renal and other end-organ damage. We originally conducted two phase 2 studies (26 weeks and 1 year) ...

Last Updated: 8 May 2015

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The terms "Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 2" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

A Study of an Investigational Drug, Cemdisiran (ALN-CC5), in Patients With Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 1 Nov 2017

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Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome; 4p16.3 Microduplication Syndrome; 4p Deletion Syndrome, Non-Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Stickler Syndrome; Stickler Syndrome Type 2; Stickler Syndrome Type 1; Stickler Syndrome; Mucolipidosis Type 4; X-linked Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4; X-linked Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; X-linked Intellectual Disability - Ataxia - Apraxia; X-linked Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia; X-linked Non Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia; X-linked Cerebellar Ataxia; Vitamin B12 Deficiency Ataxia; Toxic Exposure Ataxia; Unclassified Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia; Thyroid Antibody Ataxia; Sporadic Adult-onset Ataxia of Unknown Etiology; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Oculomotor Anomaly; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Epilepsy; Spinocerebellar Ataxia With Axonal Neuropathy Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 8; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 37; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 36; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 35; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 34; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 32; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 31; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 30; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 29; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 28; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 27; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 26; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 25; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 23; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 22; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 21; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 20; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 19/22; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 18; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 17; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 16; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 15/16; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 14; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 13; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 12; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 11; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 With Axonal Neuropathy; Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Unknown; Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Dysmorphism; Non Progressive Epilepsy and/or Ataxia With Myoclonus as a Major Feature; Spectrin-associated Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia; Spasticity-ataxia-gait Anomalies Syndrome; Spastic Ataxia With Congenital Miosis; Spastic Ataxia - Corneal Dystrophy; Spastic Ataxia; Rare Hereditary Ataxia; Rare Ataxia; Recessive Mitochondrial Ataxia Syndrome; Progressive Epilepsy and/or Ataxia With Myoclonus as a Major Feature; Posterior Column Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa; Post-Stroke Ataxia; Post-Head Injury Ataxia; Post Vaccination Ataxia; Polyneuropathy - Hearing Loss - Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa - Cataract; Muscular Atrophy - Ataxia - Retinitis Pigmentosa - Diabetes Mellitus; Non-progressive Cerebellar Ataxia With Intellectual Disability; Non-hereditary Degenerative Ataxia; Paroxysmal Dystonic Choreathetosis With Episodic Ataxia and Spasticity; Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy - Deafness; NARP Syndrome; Myoclonus - Cerebellar Ataxia - Deafness; Multiple System Atrophy, Parkinsonian Type; Multiple System Atrophy, Cerebellar Type; Multiple System Atrophy; Maternally-inherited Leigh Syndrome; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 3; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 2; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 1; Lethal Ataxia With Deafness and Optic Atrophy; Leigh Syndrome; Leukoencephalopathy With Mild Cerebellar Ataxia and White Matter Edema; Leukoencephalopathy - Ataxia - Hypodontia - Hypomyelination; Leigh Syndrome With Nephrotic Syndrome; Leigh Syndrome With Leukodystrophy; Leigh Syndrome With Cardiomyopathy; Late-onset Ataxia With Dementia; Intellectual Disability-hyperkinetic Movement-truncal Ataxia Syndrome; Infection or Post Infection Ataxia; Infantile-onset Autosomal Recessive Nonprogressive Cerebellar Ataxia; Infantile Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia; GAD Ataxia; Hereditary Episodic Ataxia; Gliadin/Gluten Ataxia; Friedreich Ataxia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Familial Paroxysmal Ataxia; Exposure to Medications Ataxia; Episodic Ataxia With Slurred Speech; Episodic Ataxia Unknown Type; Episodic Ataxia Type 7; Episodic Ataxia Type 6; Episodic Ataxia Type 5; Episodic Ataxia Type 4; Episodic Ataxia Type 3; Episodic Ataxia Type 1; Epilepsy and/or Ataxia With Myoclonus as Major Feature; Early-onset Spastic Ataxia-neuropathy Syndrome; Early-onset Progressive Neurodegeneration - Blindness - Ataxia - Spasticity; Early-onset Cerebellar Ataxia With Retained Tendon Reflexes; Early-onset Ataxia With Dementia; Childhood-onset Autosomal Recessive Slowly Progressive Spinocerebellar Ataxia; Dilated Cardiomyopathy With Ataxia; Cataract - Ataxia - Deafness; Cerebellar Ataxia, Cayman Type; Cerebellar Ataxia With Peripheral Neuropathy; Cerebellar Ataxia - Hypogonadism; Cerebellar Ataxia - Ectodermal Dysplasia; Cerebellar Ataxia - Areflexia - Pes Cavus - Optic Atrophy - Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Brain Tumor Ataxia; Brachydactyly - Nystagmus - Cerebellar Ataxia; Benign Paroxysmal Tonic Upgaze of Childhood With Ataxia; Autosomal Recessive Syndromic Cerebellar Ataxia; Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia With Leukoencephalopathy; Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay; Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia - Optic Atrophy - Dysarthria; Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxia; Autosomal Recessive Metabolic Cerebellar Ataxia; Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Due to Repeat Expansions That do Not Encode Polyglutamine; Autosomal Recessive Ataxia, Beauce Type; Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Due to Ubiquinone Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Ataxia Due to PEX10 Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Degenerative and Progressive Cerebellar Ataxia; Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Due to MGLUR1 Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia Due to GRID2 Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Congenital Cerebellar Ataxia; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia-pyramidal Signs-nystagmus-oculomotor Apraxia Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia-epilepsy-intellectual Disability Syndrome Due to WWOX Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia-epilepsy-intellectual Disability Syndrome Due to TUD Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia-epilepsy-intellectual Disability Syndrome Due to KIAA0226 Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia-epilepsy-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia With Late-onset Spasticity; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Due to STUB1 Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Due to a DNA Repair Defect; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia - Saccadic Intrusion; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia - Psychomotor Retardation; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia - Blindness - Deafness; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia; Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Due to a Polyglutamine Anomaly; Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Due to a Point Mutation; Autosomal Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxia Due to a Channelopathy; Autosomal Dominant Spastic Ataxia Type 1; Autosomal Dominant Spastic Ataxia; Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy; Ataxia-telangiectasia Variant; Ataxia-telangiectasia; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia, Deafness and Narcolepsy; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia Type 4; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia Type 3; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia Type 2; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia Type 1; Autosomal Dominant Cerebellar Ataxia; Ataxia-telangiectasia-like Disorder; Ataxia-intellectual Disability-oculomotor Apraxia-cerebellar Cysts Syndrome; Ataxia-deafness-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Ataxia With Vitamin E Deficiency; Ataxia With Dementia; Ataxia Neuropathy Spectrum; Ataxia - Tapetoretinal Degeneration; Ataxia - Photosensitivity - Short Stature; Ataxia - Pancytopenia; Ataxia - Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1; Ataxia - Hypogonadism - Choroidal Dystrophy; Ataxia - Other; Ataxia - Genetic Diagnosis - Unknown; Acquired Ataxia; Adult-onset Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia; Alcohol Related Ataxia; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type II; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Type IV; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia, Type 3; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome; Atypical HUS; Wiedemann-Steiner Syndrome; Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA); Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Behcet's Disease

 

Last Updated: 28 Sep 2017

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