CCTGA

Common Name(s)

CCTGA, Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries

Congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CCTGA) is a rare heart defect present at birth (congenital) where the lower chambers of the heart (ventricles) do not function properly. CCTGA accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart defects. Normally, the right ventricle is smaller and less strong because it only has to pump blood low in oxygen to the lungs. The left ventricle is larger and stronger because it has to pump the oxygen rich blood to the whole body. In CCTGA, during development, the heart twists and the larger, stronger ventricle (normally on the left side) ends up on the right side of the heart. It receives the blood low in oxygen and is now connected to the pulmonary artery so the blood is sent to the lungs. But the smaller, weaker ventricle is now on the left, and though it pumps the oxygen rich blood into the aorta to go out to the rest of the body, it is not built to do this job for a normal lifetime. CCTGA can be found alone or with other congenital heart defects, such as VSDs, Ebstein-like valves, and heart’s electrical signals blockages.

The symptoms of CCTGA are fainting and fatigue. Some people may also have an abnormal sound in their heartbeat (heart murmur). Many do not have symptoms until adulthood. However, symptoms may vary and even infants may show signs immediately after birth. The causes of CCTGA are not yet known, but parents with CCTGA do not seem to pass the defect to their children.

The most common tests to diagnose CCTGA are an echocardiogram and a cardiac MRI. Treatments vary greatly. If CCTGA is isolated (no other heart defects), treatment may not be needed. Children now born with this condition have a much better life expectancy than previous generations but will still need to see a cardiologist throughout their lifetime. Research is ongoing, so talk to your cardiologist about the current treatment options. Support groups are also a good source of information and support.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "CCTGA" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "CCTGA" returned 2 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Echocardiographic examination in patients with corrected transposition of great arteries (L-TGA, ccTGA) with failure of systemic (anatomically) right ventricle treated with resynchronisation therapy].
 

Author(s): Andrzej Maziarz, Andrzej Ząbek, Barbara Małecka, Jacek Lelakowski

Journal: Kardiol Pol. 2010 Nov;68(11):1287-90.

 

A congestive heart failure is common in population of adult patients with congenital heart disease, especially among patients with systemic right ventricle. According to literature 4-9% of patients with systemic right ventricle can be treated with resynchronisation therapy (CRT). ...

Last Updated: 25 Nov 2010

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Serial measurement of the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) predicts poor outcome in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA).
 

Author(s): Tanja M Raedle-Hurst, Meryem Hosse, Hashim Abdul-Khaliq

Journal: Eur. J. Heart Fail.. 2010 May;12(5):521-3.

 

The usefulness of natriuretic peptides to assess myocardial function in patients with a systemic morphological right ventricle is still unclear. In this report we describe the clinical course of a young woman with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) ...

Last Updated: 22 Apr 2010

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "CCTGA" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.