Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2L

Common Name(s)

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2L, CDG 2L

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2L (CDG 2L) is part of a group of rare inherited disorders that are present at birth (congenital) and involve defects in the glycosylation process. Glycosylation involves the joining of sugars and proteins (to form glycoproteins) by enzymes (proteins that function to convert specific substances in the body) in the cells of our bodies. These sugars (glycans) must be properly attached to specific proteins in the cells in order for the cells to function correctly. Due to the many functions of these glycoproteins throughout the body, if an error occurs in one of the many steps of the process, a wide variety of health problems will occur beginning in infancy. Symptoms can include psychomotor delays (movement, coordination, dexterity), mental retardation, and distinct physical features including wide-set eyes, an additional finger per hand, and small head circumference. Additional reported symptoms include vomiting, recurring infections, diarrhea, and partial seizures.

Diagnosis can be made through blood work that allows enzyme function to be analyzed. Treatment includes nutritional supplements and monitoring as well as treatment for any specific symptoms. If your baby has been diagnosed with CDG 2L talk with your babies doctor about the most current treatment options.

Genetic testing is also available to help determine the specific type of CDG disorder. CDG type 2A is caused by mutations in the COG6 gene. It is passed through families in an autosomal recessive manner. Autosomal recessive means that an individual must have two copies of the changed gene or mutation that causes the condition. A person with one changed gene would be a carrier of the condition but usually will not have any symptoms. Talk with a genetic counselor or specialist if someone in your family has been diagnosed with CDG disorder.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2L" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.