Carotenemia

Common Name(s)

Carotenemia

Carotenemia is a condition that causes the skin to turn a yellow color caused by high levels of beta-carotene in the blood. It is commonly a result of prolonged and excessive consumption of carotene-rich foods, such as carrots, squash, and sweet potatoes. Carotenemia has also been related to hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hepatic disorders, anorexia nervosa, and renal diseases. The condition is harmless, but is often mistaken for jaundice. Because carotenemia is benign, no treatment is necessary. By limiting the amount of carotene-rich foods, carotene levels typically drop within a week and the yellow discoloration of the skin disappears within a few weeks/months.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Carotenemia" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Carotenemia" returned 3 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Transport of beta-carotene in serum of individuals with carotenemia.
 

Author(s): F J Auletta, C L Gulbrandsen

Journal: Clin. Chem.. 1974 Dec;20(12):1578-9.

 

Last Updated: 18 Feb 1975

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Carotenemia in mentally retarded children. I. Incidence and etiology.
 

Author(s): H Patel, H G Dunn, B Tischer, A K McBurney, E Hach

Journal: Can Med Assoc J. 1973 Apr;108(7):848-52.

 

The incidence and etiology of carotenemia in mentally retarded children were examined. Fasting serum carotenoid and vitamin A levels were measured in 77 profoundly mentally retarded children aged 3 to 19 years who were receiving a standard diet containing 2000 IU of carotene (expressed ...

Last Updated: 31 Jul 1973

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Carotenemia associated with papaya ingestion.
 

Author(s): D J Costanza

Journal: Calif Med. 1968 Oct;109(4):319-20.

 

Last Updated: 4 Jan 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Carotenemia" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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