Cutaneous larva migrans

Common Name(s)

Cutaneous larva migrans

Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a skin infection caused by various parasites from the hookworm family (ancylostomatidae). These parasites are usually found in tropical and sub-tropical areas and live in animal hosts such as dogs, cats, and wild animals. It is most commonly contracted by coming into contact with the contaminated animal feces, usually on the ground. Though in animals this infection can spread into deeper tissues, in humans, the larva can only penetrate the upper layer of skin. Symptoms include very itchy red skin patches in the affected area that look like worm-like burrows. The skin patches may be painful and excessive scratching may cause secondary bacterial infections. CLM will usually go away on its own in a couple of weeks to months, but the process can be facilitated using certain topical or oral drugs. Anti-itch creams such as cortisone or Benadryl can help with symptom relief. To help prevent contracting this infection, wear shoes when walking in soil and beaches in tropical/sub-tropical areas. If you or a family member has contracted CLM, talk with your doctor about the most current treatment options.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cutaneous larva migrans" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cutaneous larva migrans" returned 58 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Cutaneous larva migrans syndrome on a malformed foot (a case report)].
 

Author(s): Imane Benbella, Hanane Khalki, Khalid Lahmadi, Sara Kouara, Abderrahim Abbadi, Mohammed Er-Rami

Journal:

 

Cutaneous larva migrans syndrome is a subcutaneous dermatitis caused by hookworms' larvae, originating from animals in parasitic impasse in humans. Transcutaneous infestation is favored by contact with contaminated soil. We report the case of a 15-month-old child, native of Guinea ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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[Response to the Letter to the Editor: Autochthonous cutaneous larva migrans in Chile. A case report].
 

Author(s): Carmen Gloria González, Natalia Galilea Ortuzar

Journal: Rev Chil Pediatr. ;87(4):329.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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[Autochthonous cutaneous larva migrans in Chile. A case report].
 

Author(s): Lautaro Vargas Pérez

Journal: Rev Chil Pediatr. ;87(4):328.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cutaneous larva migrans" returned 5 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

An unusual recurrence of pruritic creeping eruption after treatment of cutaneous larva migrans in an adult Ghanaian male: a case report with a brief review of literature.
 

Author(s): Neils Ben Quashie, Emmanuel Tsegah

Journal:

 

The hookworm related Cutaneous Larva Migrans is a common disease present in the tropic and subtropical areas of the world. The disease is self limiting and would naturally resolve within weeks. However, an unusual recurrence of the disease in a Ghanaian male after standard treatment ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Löffler syndrome caused by extensive cutaneous larva migrans: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): M Te Booij, Emgj de Jong, H J Bovenschen

Journal:

 

In rare cases, cutaneous larva migrans may be complicated by Löffler syndrome. This syndrome is thought to result from a type I hypersensitivity reaction related to the pulmonary larval migration phase of various parasites. It is characterized by migratory pulmonary eosinophilic ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Acute pruritic rash on the foot. Cutaneous larva migrans.
 

Author(s): Marisol Reavis, Sarah Jorgensen

Journal: Am Fam Physician. 2010 Jan;81(2):203.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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