Cyanotic heart disease

Common Name(s)

Cyanotic heart disease

Cyanotic heart disease is a group of birth defects affecting the heart, meaning that the infant’s heart does not develop correctly during pregnancy. The result of this defect is low oxygen levels in the blood, which makes the skin appear blue (cyanotic). Heart defects causing cyanotic heart disease can be caused by drug, chemical or infectious exposure during pregnancy. It is sometimes related to the genetic and chromosomal disorders such as Down syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Turner syndrome, and Noonan syndrome. The main symptom of cyanotic heart disease is bluish lips, fingers and toes, particularly when the infant is feeding or crying. Some may also experience trouble breathing. Spells of low oxygen are common and may cause anxiety, breathing too quickly or sudden increase in blue color. Cyanotic heart disease can be diagnosed in a physical examination by a physician, but this may require further tests and imaging, such as an x-ray of the heart or an echocardiogram. Most infants diagnosed with cyanotic heart disease at birth will have to stay in the hospital to receive oxygen and further medical care. The suggested treatment for cyanotic heart disease is surgery to repair the defect. This surgery may occur shortly after birth, or in some cases it can be delayed a number of months or years.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Cyanotic heart disease" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Cyanotic heart disease" returned 121 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Sickle Cell Disease with Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease: Long-Term Outcomes in 5 Children.
 

Author(s): Glen J Iannucci, Olufolake A Adisa, Matthew E Oster, Michael McConnell, William T Mahle

Journal:

 

Sickle cell disease is a risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents in the pediatric population. This risk is compounded by hypoxemia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease can expose patients to prolonged hypoxemia. To our knowledge, the long-term outcome of patients who have combined ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease.
 

Author(s): Mónica Muñoz-López, Aparna Hoskote, Martin J Chadwick, Anna M Dzieciol, David G Gadian, Kling Chong, Tina Banks, Michelle de Haan, Torsten Baldeweg, Mortimer Mishkin, Faraneh Vargha-Khadem

Journal: Hippocampus. 2017 Apr;27(4):417-424.

 

Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8-16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Congenital Heart Disease With and Without Cyanotic Potential and the Long-term Risk of Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Follow-up Study.
 

Author(s): Nicolas L Madsen, Bradley S Marino, Jessica G Woo, Reimar W Thomsen, Jørgen Videbœk, Henning Bœkgaard Laursen, Morten Olsen

Journal:

 

Long-term survival for persons born with congenital heart disease (CHD) is improved, but limited knowledge exists of this growing population's acquired cardiovascular risk profile. This study's purpose was to assess CHD survivors' risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with attention ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Cyanotic heart disease" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Cyanotic congenital heart disease the coronary arterial circulation.
 

Author(s): Joseph K Perloff

Journal: Curr Cardiol Rev. 2012 Feb;8(1):1-5.

 

The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Intestinal microbiota and blue baby syndrome: probiotic therapy for term neonates with cyanotic congenital heart disease.
 

Author(s): Collin L Ellis, John C Rutledge, Mark A Underwood

Journal: Gut Microbes. ;1(6):359-66.

 

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common intestinal emergency among premature infants. Risk factors in premature infants include immature intestinal immunity and an intestinal microbiota dominated by hospital-acquired bacteria. Some probiotics have been shown to decrease ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Cyanotic congenital heart disease: hematologic management.
 

Author(s): M C Territo, M H Rosove

Journal: J. Am. Coll. Cardiol.. 1991 Aug;18(2):320-2.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Monitor Faecal Calprotectin Concentration in Infants With Heart Defects
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Calprotectin; Cyanotic Heart Disease

 

Last Updated: 9 Nov 2017

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Cyanotic Heart Disease and Thrombosis
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Thrombosis

 

Last Updated: 27 Mar 2016

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Erythropoietin to Prevent Unnecessary Transfusions In Patients With Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease - A Prospective Control Trial
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease; Anemia; Cyanosis; Congenital Heart Disease

 

Last Updated: 2 Feb 2017

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