Dense deposit disease

Common Name(s)

Dense deposit disease

Dense deposit disease (DDD) is a condition that primarily affects kidney function. Signs and symptoms usually start between the ages of 5 and 15 but may also begin in adulthood. The major features of DDD are due to kidney malfunction, and often include proteinuria; hematuria; reduced amounts of urine; low levels of protein in the blood; and swelling in many areas of the body. About half of affected people develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within 10 years after symptoms start. DDD can have genetic or non-genetic causes. It can be caused by mutations in the C3 and CFH genes; it may develop as a result of both genetic risk factors and environmental triggers; or it can result from the presence of autoantibodies that block the activity of proteins needed for the body's immune response. Most cases are sporadic (occurring by chance in people with no history of the disorder in their family).
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Dense deposit disease" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Dense deposit disease" returned 29 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Eculizumab in Pediatric Dense Deposit Disease.
 

Author(s): Michiel J S Oosterveld, Mark R Garrelfs, Bernd Hoppe, Sandrine Florquin, Joris J T H Roelofs, L P van den Heuvel, Kerstin Amann, Jean-Claude Davin, Antonia H M Bouts, Pietrik J Schriemer, Jaap W Groothoff

Journal: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2015 Oct;10(10):1773-82.

 

Dense deposit disease (DDD), a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy, is a rare disease affecting mostly children. Treatment options are limited. Debate exists whether eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against complement factor C5, is effective in DDD. Reported data are scarce, especially in children.

Last Updated: 8 Oct 2015

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Dense deposit disease in an elderly patient: report of a case.
 

Author(s): Dai Ohno, Yukinao Sakai, Anna Suzuki, Koji Mugishima, Yuichiro Sumi, Yusuke Otsuka, Tomoyuki Otsuka, Akira Shimizu, Shuichi Tsuruoka

Journal: J Nippon Med Sch. 2014 ;81(3):120-1.

 

Last Updated: 7 Jul 2014

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C4 dense-deposit disease.
 

Author(s): Sanjeev Sethi, Anne Sullivan, Richard J H Smith

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2014 Feb;370(8):784-6.

 

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Dense deposit disease" returned 5 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis.
 

Author(s): Lavleen Singh, Geetika Singh, Swati Bhardwaj, Aditi Sinha, Arvind Bagga, Amit Dinda

Journal: J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.. 2016 Jan;27(1):59-62.

 

Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, ...

Last Updated: 1 Jan 2016

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Dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulopathy.
 

Author(s): Thomas D Barbour, Matthew C Pickering, H Terence Cook

Journal: Semin. Nephrol.. 2013 Nov;33(6):493-507.

 

C3 glomerulopathy refers to those renal lesions characterized histologically by predominant C3 accumulation within the glomerulus, and pathogenetically by aberrant regulation of the alternative pathway of complement. Dense deposit disease is distinguished from other forms of C3 glomerulopathy ...

Last Updated: 28 Oct 2013

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Dense deposit disease.
 

Author(s): Richard J H Smith, Claire L Harris, Matthew C Pickering

Journal: Mol. Immunol.. 2011 Aug;48(14):1604-10.

 

Dense deposit disease (DDD) is an orphan disease that primarily affects children and young adults without sexual predilection. Studies of its pathophysiology have shown conclusively that it is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative pathway of complement, however the ...

Last Updated: 22 Jul 2011

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Safety Study of IgAN, LN, MN, & C3 Glomerulopathy Including Dense Deposit Disease Treated With OMS721
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: IgAN; Lupus Nephritis; MN; C3G

 

Last Updated: 31 Jul 2017

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A Proof-of-Mechanism Study to Determine the Effect of ACH-0144471 on C3 Levels in Patients With C3G or IC-MPGN
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: C3 Glomerulonephritis; Dense Deposit Disease; Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis, Type II; C3 Glomerulopathy; Immune Complex Mediated Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis

 

Last Updated: 3 Oct 2017

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Controlled Trial Evaluating Avacopan in C3 Glomerulopathy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: C3 Glomerulopathy (C3G)

 

Last Updated: 29 Sep 2017

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