Dysphagia

Common Name(s)

Dysphagia

Dysphagia refers to difficulty swallowing, such as due to pain or increased effort. Dysphagia is classified based on whether there is a muscular, nerve, or structural problem. These could be due to trauma, neuromuscular disorders, hardening or tightening of skin and connective tissue, or swelling of nearby structures. Other structural problems include obstruction of the throat or esophagus. Functional dysphagia occurs when patients have trouble swallowing with no clear cause.

About 15 million Americans are affected by dysphagia, with about 1 million new diagnoses each year. About half of all Americans over the age of 60 will experience dysphagia. In addition to the causes described above, health conditions such as stroke, degenerative neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s Disease or ALS, and cancer of the head and neck can all cause dysphagia.

Not all affected individuals will recognize that they have dysphagia. Dysphagia is important to diagnose because it increases the risk of pneumonia due to the introduction of food, saliva, and nasal secretions to the airway. Additionally, dysphagia may lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and kidney failure. Symptoms of dysphagia include an inability to control food or saliva in the mouth, coughing, choking, difficulty starting to swallow, recurrent pneumonia, weight loss, wet voice after swallowing, and nasal regurgitation. In severe cases, individuals may be unable to swallow solid food and there may be pain when trying to swallow.

Treatments for dysphagia include surgery, medication, and feeding tubes. In addition, lifestyle changes such as regular exercise and diet modification may be suggested. If you are suffering from dysphagia, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Dysphagia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Dysphagia" for support, advocacy or research.

Association of Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders, Inc. (AGMD)

AGMD is a nonprofit international organization which serves as an integral educational resource concerning digestive motility diseases and disorders. It also functions as an important information base for members of the medical and scientific communities. In addition, it provides a forum for patients suffering from digestive motility diseases and disorders as well as their families and members of the medical community.

http://www.agmd-gimotility.org

Last Updated: 28 Feb 2015

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Dysphagia" returned 749 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The importance of dysphagia screening and nutritional assessment in hospitalized patients.
 

Author(s): Patrícia Amaro Andrade, Carolina Araújo Dos Santos, Heloísa Helena Firmino, Carla de Oliveira Barbosa Rosa

Journal:

 

To determine frequency of dysphagia risk and associated factors in hospitalized patients as well as to evaluate nutritional status by using different methods and correlate the status with scores of the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10).

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Treatment of Ramsay-Hunt's syndrome with multiple cranial nerve involvement and severe dysphagia: A case report.
 

Author(s): Jong Min Kim, Zeeihn Lee, Seungwoo Han, Donghwi Park

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(17):e0591.

 

Ramsay-Hunt's syndrome (RHS) is a disorder characterized by facial paralysis, herpetic eruptions on the auricle, and otic pain due to the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion. A few cases of multiple cranial nerve invasion including the vestibulocochlear ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A case report of life-threatening acute dysphagia in dermatomyositis: Challenges in diagnosis and treatment.
 

Author(s): Kyoung Min Kwon, Jung Soo Lee, Yeo Hyung Kim

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(17):e0508.

 

Although dysphagia is a known complication of dermatomyositis, sudden onset of dysphagia without the notable aggravation of other symptoms can make the diagnosis and treatment challenging.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Dysphagia" returned 86 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Dysphagia: Thinking outside the box.
 

Author(s): Hamish Philpott, Mayur Garg, Dunya Tomic, Smrithya Balasubramanian, Rami Sweis

Journal: World J. Gastroenterol.. 2017 Oct;23(38):6942-6951.

 

Dysphagia is a common symptom that is important to recognise and appropriately manage, given that causes include life threatening oesophageal neoplasia, oropharyngeal dysfunction, the risk of aspiration, as well as chronic disabling gastroesophageal reflux (GORD). The predominant ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Patient-reported outcome measures in dysphagia: a systematic review of instrument development and validation.
 

Author(s): D A Patel, R Sharda, K L Hovis, E E Nichols, N Sathe, D F Penson, I D Feurer, M L McPheeters, M F Vaezi, David O Francis

Journal: Dis. Esophagus. 2017 May;30(5):1-23.

 

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are commonly used to capture patient experience with dysphagia and to evaluate treatment effectiveness. Inappropriate application can lead to distorted results in clinical studies. A systematic review of the literature on dysphagia-related PRO ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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The Use of Brain Stimulation in Dysphagia Management.
 

Author(s): Andre Simons, Shaheen Hamdy

Journal: Dysphagia. 2017 04;32(2):209-215.

 

Dysphagia is common sequela of brain injury with as many as 50% of patients suffering from dysphagia following stroke. Currently, the majority of guidelines for clinical practice in the management of dysphagia focus on the prevention of complications while any natural recovery takes ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 15 May 2018

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Anesthetic to Reduce Dysphagia After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Surgery
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Dysphagia

 

Last Updated: 27 Feb 2018

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Utilization of Negative Pressure Suction to Reduce Aspiration in Oropharyngeal Dysphagia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

 

Last Updated: 4 Dec 2017

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