Eosinophilic folliculitis

Common Name(s)

Eosinophilic folliculitis

Eosinophilic folliculitis is a rare skin disorder characterized by the formation of raised, small, fluid-filled bumps (pustules) in cycles. These skin bumps are caused by changes in hair follicles, or the site where hair grows out of the skin. There are three types of eosinophilic folliculitis: classic eosinophilic pustular folliculitis, immunosuppression-associated eosinophilic folliculitis, and infancy associated eosinophilic folliculitis. Eosinophilic folliculitis is most common among adults age 20-40, and the infancy associated type is most common among infants age 5 to 10 months. This disorder affects males more often than females, is most common among individuals with HIV/AIDS, and the classic type most often affect those of Japanese decent.

The main symptom of eosinophilic folliculitis is the presence of small, raised, fluid-filled bumps on the skin. A type of white blood cell, called eosinophils, clump in the hair follicles on the skin to cause these bumps. The bumps tend to appear on the face and stomach, but can be found on all areas of the body. The bumps may also be itchy or painful. After a patch of bumps heals, the skin may appear darker in this area.

Eosinophilic folliculitis can be diagnosed using tests to rule out infection from fungus or bacteria that could also be a cause of the pustules. A blood test for eosinophil levels may also be performed. Medication may be used to treat the skin bumps seen in this disease. Talk to your doctor or dermatologist about the most current treatment options.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Eosinophilic folliculitis" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Eosinophilic folliculitis" returned 19 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Two cases of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis associated with pregnancy.
 

Author(s): Yoshihiro Matsudate, Yuki Miyaoka, Yoshio Urano

Journal: J. Dermatol.. 2016 Feb;43(2):218-9.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis clinically presenting as orofacial granuloma: successful treatment with indomethacin, but not ibuprofen.
 

Author(s): Koji Ono, Takashi Hashimoto, Takahiro Satoh

Journal: Acta Derm. Venereol.. 2015 Mar;95(3):361-2.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Widespread eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in a nonimmunocompromised patient.
 

Author(s): Ana Almodovar-Real, Alejandro Molina-Leyva, María Jose Espiñeira-Carmona, Rosa Ríos-Pelegrina, Ramón Naranjo-Sintes, Husein Husein El-Ahmed

Journal: Med Princ Pract. 2014 ;23(5):475-7.

 

We present a case of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis, a rare dermatosis which is often associated with HIV infection or internal malignancies.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Eosinophilic folliculitis" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Eosinophilic folliculitis in a patient after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Mitsuhito Ota, Tadamichi Shimizu, Satoshi Hashino, Hiroshi Shimizu

Journal: Am. J. Hematol.. 2004 Jul;76(3):295-6.

 

We describe a patient with eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) that developed 3 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Skin biopsy specimen revealed numerous eosinophil infiltrations from the hair follicles to the sebaceous glands. No ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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