Exostoses

Common Name(s)

Exostoses

Exostoses are abnormal bone growths on the surface of a pre-existing bone caused by having too much calcium in the body. They can cause constant, long-lasting pain ranging from mild to severe, depending on the shape, size, and location of the growth. They normally form on the joints of bones such as the ankle or knee and can grow outward toward the skin. Exostoses are typically noncancerous, but can become cancerous in some instances. Exostoses are usually treated by surgically removing the growth.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Exostoses" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 89 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

External auditory exostoses in the Xuchang and Xujiayao human remains: Patterns and implications among eastern Eurasian Middle and Late Pleistocene crania.
 

Author(s): Erik Trinkaus, Xiu-Jie Wu

Journal:

 

In the context of Middle and Late Pleistocene eastern Eurasian human crania, the external auditory exostoses (EAE) of the late archaic Xuchang 1 and 2 and the Xujiayao 15 early Late Pleistocene human temporal bones are described. Xujiayao 15 has small EAE (Grade 1), Xuchang 1 presents ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A genotype-phenotype study of hereditary multiple exostoses in forty-six Chinese patients.
 

Author(s): Yuchan Li, Jian Wang, Zhigang Wang, Jingyan Tang, Tingting Yu

Journal:

 

Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) is a rare autosomal dominant skeletal disorder that can cause a variety of clinical manifestations. We aimed to evaluate the general clinical phenotypic severity of HME by using a scoring system and correlate the genotypes with different clinical ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Unsuspected osteochondroma-like outgrowths in the cranial base of Hereditary Multiple Exostoses patients and modeling and treatment with a BMP antagonist in mice.
 

Author(s): Sayantani Sinha, Christina Mundy, Till Bechtold, Federica Sgariglia, Mazen M Ibrahim, Paul C Billings, Kristen Carroll, Eiki Koyama, Kevin B Jones, Maurizio Pacifici

Journal:

 

Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME) is a rare pediatric disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the heparan sulfate (HS)-synthesizing enzymes EXT1 or EXT2. HME is characterized by formation of cartilaginous outgrowths-called osteochondromas- next to the ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Exostoses" returned 5 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Imaging of benign complications of exostoses of the shoulder, pelvic girdles and appendicular skeleton.
 

Author(s): M Gavanier, A Blum

Journal: Diagn Interv Imaging. 2017 Jan;98(1):21-28.

 

Exostoses are the most common benign bone tumors, accounting for 10 to 15% of all bone tumors. They develop at the bone surface by enchondral ossification and stop growing when skeletal maturity has been reached. At first, exostoses are covered by a smooth cartilage cap that progressively ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Endoscopic transcanal removal of symptomatic external auditory canal exostoses.
 

Author(s): Elliott D Kozin, Aaron K Remenschneider, Parth V Shah, Edward Reardon, Daniel J Lee

Journal: Am J Otolaryngol. ;36(2):283-6.

 

Exostoses are bony outgrowths of the external auditory canal (EAC) that can lead to cerumen entrapment, recurrent infections, and conductive hearing loss. When surgical removal is indicated, a drill or osteotome may be used via a post-auricular, endaural, or transcanal approach. Studies ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Heparan sulfate in skeletal development, growth, and pathology: the case of hereditary multiple exostoses.
 

Author(s): Julianne Huegel, Federica Sgariglia, Motomi Enomoto-Iwamoto, Eiki Koyama, John P Dormans, Maurizio Pacifici

Journal: Dev. Dyn.. 2013 Sep;242(9):1021-32.

 

Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of cell surface and matrix-associated proteoglycans. Due to their sulfation patterns, the HS chains interact with numerous signaling proteins and regulate their distribution and activity on target cells. Many of these proteins, including ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Autologous Stem Cells in Achilles Tendinopathy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Achilles Tendinitis, Right Leg; Achilles Tendinitis; Achilles Degeneration; Achilles Tendon Thickening; Tendinopathy; Achilles Tendinitis, Left Leg

 

Last Updated: 11 May 2016

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Predictors of Outcome and Natural History in Patients With Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Cervical Spondylosis With Myelopathy

 

Last Updated: 14 Oct 2016

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Last Updated: 12 Oct 2016

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