Factor I Deficiency

Common Name(s)

Factor I Deficiency

Factor I deficiency is a blood-clotting disorder that results in excessive or prolonged bleeding after an injury or surgery. Factor I is one of 13 proteins involved in proper formation of blood clots. Blood clots are needed to heal wounds, form scabs, and stop bleeding. When factor I levels are low or absent, the blood does not clot correctly, leading to excessive bleeding. Factor I deficiency runs in families and affect both males and females equally. The main symptom of factor I deficiency is excessive and abnormal bleeding. This may occur after childbirth, surgery, trauma, and with menstruation (periods). Bleeding can also occur in the muscles, joints, the mouth, the gut, or, infrequently, the brain. Easy bruising and nosebleeds are also common. Factor I deficiency can be diagnosed by a physician using blood tests. Treatment for factor I deficiency is largely based on controlling bleeding and treating any underlying conditions that contribute to excessive bleeding. When necessary, excessive bleeding can be stopped with infusions of clotting factors into the blood.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Factor I Deficiency" for support, advocacy or research.

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The Haemophilia Society

To ensure that people affected by bleeding disorders have the freedom to make choices and seize opportunities To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to better understand and manage their condition or situation. To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to participate in decision making and service delivery. To influence policy and improve services to people with bleeding disorders.

Last Updated: 3 Apr 2013

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General Support Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Factor I Deficiency" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
The Haemophilia Society

To ensure that people affected by bleeding disorders have the freedom to make choices and seize opportunities To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to better understand and manage their condition or situation. To enable people affected by bleeding disorders to participate in decision making and service delivery. To influence policy and improve services to people with bleeding disorders.

http://www.haemophilia.org.uk/

Last Updated: 3 Apr 2013

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Factor I Deficiency" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Factor I Deficiency" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 17 Nov 2017

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Pharmacokinetic, Efficacy and Safety of BT524 in Patients With Congenital Fibrinogen Deficiency
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Congenital Afibrinogenemia; Congenital Hypofibrinogenemia

 

Last Updated: 17 Jan 2018

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Last Updated: 1 Aug 2017

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