Fibrocartilaginous Embolism

Common Name(s)

Fibrocartilaginous Embolism

A fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) is an unusual cause of spinal cord and cerebral ischemia (insufficient blood supply). Symptoms may include sudden, severe pain in the neck and/or back; progressive weakening and reduced sensation; and paralysis. It may be caused by the blocking of an artery (embolization) with nucleus pulposus fragments (a substance that provides cushioning to the spinal column), which interrupts the vascular supply. Some individuals have reported lifting, physical exertion, minor trauma, or Valsalva maneuver before severe spinal cord infarction. FCE can result in severe spinal cord injury or death in some individuals.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Fibrocartilaginous Embolism" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Fibrocartilaginous Embolism" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Fibrocartilaginous Embolism" returned 3 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acute ischemic stroke from fibrocartilaginous embolism to the middle cerebral artery.
 

Author(s): G Toro-González, L Navarro-Román, G C Román, J Cantillo, B Serrano, M Herrera, I Vergara

Journal: Stroke. 1993 May;24(5):738-40.

 

Fibrocartilaginous embolism from the nucleus pulposus has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord ischemia. We were unable to find previous reports of embolism from this source to cerebral arteries.

Last Updated: 7 Jun 1993

Go To URL
Medial medullary infarction from fibrocartilaginous embolism to the anterior spinal artery.
 

Author(s): C S Kase, J N Varakis, J R Stafford, J P Mohr

Journal: Stroke. ;14(3):413-8.

 

A previously healthy young woman presented with sudden onset of quadriplegia, anesthesia below the C3 dermatome, respiratory paralysis, vertical nystagmus, ocular bobbing and cortical blindness. After partial resolution of the latter deficits, she remained quadriplegic, with a C3 ...

Last Updated: 14 Feb 1984

Go To URL
Posterior paralysis due to fibrocartilaginous embolism in two weaner pigs.
 

Author(s): S V Tessaro, C E Doige, C S Rhodes

Journal: Can. J. Comp. Med.. 1983 Apr;47(2):124-6.

 

Acute posterior paralysis in two weaner pigs was attributed to ischemic infarction of the lumbar spinal cord due to fibrocartilaginous emboli. These arterial and venous emboli were assumed to have originated from the nucleus pulposus of one or more intervertebral discs. There was ...

Last Updated: 21 Oct 1983

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Fibrocartilaginous Embolism" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Fibrocartilaginous embolism: a comprehensive review of an under-studied cause of spinal cord infarction and proposed diagnostic criteria.
 

Author(s): Mahmoud A AbdelRazek, Ashkan Mowla, Salman Farooq, Nicholas Silvestri, Robert Sawyer, Gil Wolfe

Journal: J Spinal Cord Med. 2016 ;39(2):146-54.

 

Most spinal cord infarctions are due to aortic pathologies and aortic surgeries. Fibrocartilaginous Embolism (FCE) has been reported to represent 5.5% of spinal cord infarctions. Some believe that FCE is more common than presumed and is rather under-diagnosed due to vagueness surrounding ...

Last Updated: 15 Apr 2016

Go To URL
Fibrocartilaginous embolism of the spinal cord: a clinical and pathogenetic reconsideration.
 

Author(s): L Tosi, G Rigoli, A Beltramello

Journal: J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.. 1996 Jan;60(1):55-60.

 

A 16 year old girl did a handstand for fun, returned to her feet, experienced a sudden pain in her back, and became progressively paraplegic within 30 hours. MRI showed lumbar cord swelling, multiple Schmorl's nodes, a collapsed T11-T12 disc space, and intraspongious disc prolapse ...

Last Updated: 26 Feb 1996

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.