Gestational Hypertension

Common Name(s)

Gestational Hypertension

Gestational hypertension is also called pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Gestational hypertension affects 6-8% of all pregnant women, and is characterized by high blood pressure that develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy and goes away after delivery. Gestational hypertension is diagnosed when blood pressure is taken at prenatal visits with a physician. The health impact of gestational hypertension depends on when it is diagnosed and how high the individual's blood pressure is. 1 in 4 women with gestational hypertension may go on to develop preeclampsia, while others may need to have a cesarian section (c-section) or be induced (when medication is given to start labor). Most women with gestational hypertension will have a normal pregnancy, through increased prenatal doctor's visits, rest, decreased salt intake and lots of fluids will be important.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Gestational Hypertension" for support, advocacy or research.

Preeclampsia Foundation

The Preeclampsia Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to reduce maternal and infant illness and death due to preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy by providing patient support and education, raising public awareness, catalyzing research and improving health care practices. We envision a world where preeclampsia no longer threatens the lives of mothers and babies.

Last Updated: 23 Oct 2014

View Details
Sidelines National Support Network

Sidelines provides support, education, advocacy and resources to women and their families experiencing a complicated high-risk pregnancy or premature birth.

Last Updated: 4 Apr 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Gestational Hypertension" for support, advocacy or research.

Preeclampsia Foundation

The Preeclampsia Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to reduce maternal and infant illness and death due to preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy by providing patient support and education, raising public awareness, catalyzing research and improving health care practices. We envision a world where preeclampsia no longer threatens the lives of mothers and babies.

http://www.preeclampsia.org

Last Updated: 23 Oct 2014

View Details
Sidelines National Support Network

Sidelines provides support, education, advocacy and resources to women and their families experiencing a complicated high-risk pregnancy or premature birth.

http://www.sidelines.org

Last Updated: 4 Apr 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

General Resources

The Preeclampsia Registry

The Preeclampsia Registry is a "Living Database" bringing together those affected, their family members, and researchers to advance knowledge and discover preventions and treatments for preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and related hypertensive disorders

Updated 23 Oct 2014

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Gestational Hypertension" returned 116 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Use of placental vascularization indices and uterine artery peak systolic velocity in early detection of pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes, chronic or gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia at risk.
 

Author(s): Ábel T Altorjay, Andrea Surányi, Tibor Nyári, Gábor Németh

Journal: Croat. Med. J.. 2017 Apr;58(2):161-169.

 

We aimed to investigate correlations between uterine artery peak systolic velocity (AUtPSV), and placental vascularization in groups of normal blood pressure (NBP) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (chronic hypertension (CHT), gestational hypertension (GHT) and preeclampsia ...

Last Updated: 14 Apr 2017

Go To URL
Circulating angiogenic factors are related to the severity of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia, and their adverse outcomes.
 

Author(s): Alfredo Leaños-Miranda, Francisco Méndez-Aguilar, Karla Leticia Ramírez-Valenzuela, Marilyn Serrano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe Berumen-Lechuga, Carlos José Molina-Pérez, Irma Isordia-Salas, Inova Campos-Galicia

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jan;96(4):e6005.

 

Gestational hypertension (GH) and preeclampsia (PE) are characterized by an imbalance in angiogenic factors. However, the relationship among these factors with the severity of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) and adverse outcomes are not fully elucidated. We examined whether ...

Last Updated: 25 Jan 2017

Go To URL
A possible new approach in the prediction of late gestational hypertension: The role of the fetal aortic intima-media thickness.
 

Author(s): Silvia Visentin, Ambrogio P Londero, Martina Camerin, Enrico Grisan, Erich Cosmi

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Jan;96(2):e5515.

 

The aim was to determine the predictive role of combined screening for late-onset gestational hypertension by fetal ultrasound measurements, third trimester uterine arteries (UtAs) Doppler imaging, and maternal history. This prospective study on singleton pregnancies was conducted ...

Last Updated: 12 Jan 2017

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Gestational Hypertension" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

No Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy; No Preeclampsia-eclampsia; No Gestational Hypertension; No Hellp Syndrome. Vascular Disorder of Pregnancy Speaks for All.
 

Author(s): Yifru Berhan

Journal: Ethiop J Health Sci. 2016 Mar;26(2):177-86.

 

Hypertensive disorders complicate 5%-10% of pregnancies with increasing incidence mainly due to upward trends in obesity globally. In the last century, several terminologies have been introduced to describe the spectrum of this disease. The current and widely used classification of ...

Last Updated: 25 May 2016

Go To URL
The association between dietary factors and gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.
 

Author(s): Danielle A J M Schoenaker, Sabita S Soedamah-Muthu, Gita D Mishra

Journal:

 

Dietary factors have been suggested to play a role in the prevention of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), including gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, but inconsistent findings have been reported. A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to synthesize ...

Last Updated: 24 Jan 2015

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Prospects for the Prevention of Pregnancy-induced Hypertension and Preeclampsia Trial
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

 

Last Updated: 23 Nov 2016

Go to URL
Oral Antihypertensive Regimens for Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypertension in Pregnancy; Preeclampsia

 

Last Updated: 7 Jul 2017

Go to URL
Preeclampsia: A Marker for Future Cardiovascular Risk in Women
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Preeclampsia; Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

 

Last Updated: 23 Dec 2016

Go to URL