Hypermobility

Common Name(s)

Hypermobility

Hypermobility is a condition in which joints can easily move beyond the normal range for that particular joint. It is most common in women and children but can be seen in both genders and all ages. It is most commonly seen in the elbows, wrist, fingers, and knees. Ligaments are thick bands of tissue that help keep the joints from moving too much, but in people with hypermobile joints, this band is loose or weak. Individuals with hypermobile joints are sometimes called "double jointed". Hypermobility can cause pain in the joints, as well as arthritis. These joints may also sprain or dislocate more easily. Extra care may be needed to protect an affected person's joints. Hypermobility tends to run in families suggesting a genetic basis. This condition is diagnosed by a physical examination of the affected joints, and often requires no treatment. If treatment is needed, it will depend on the patient’s specific case. When there are no other symptoms or medical problems in a person with hypermobile joints, it is called benign hypermobility. Hypermobility however is a common feature of some rare genetic disorders. If you or someone you knows has hypermobility along with other health concerns a doctor should be consulted. (see also: Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as well as other conditions associated with hypermobility).

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypermobility" for support, advocacy or research.

Ehlers-Danlos Support UK

EDS UK was set up in 1987 to support, advise and inform those living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. We aim to help them live a full, active and positive life. Over 25 years later, we remain the only UK based charity that exclusively represents and supports people with all types of EDS. We run regular events and conferences to bring our community together, and produce literature and merchandise to increase understanding and improve management of the condition. We have over 30 support groups around the country to provide our members with a local peer support network and we hope to expand this

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Hypermobility" for support, advocacy or research.

Ehlers-Danlos Support UK

EDS UK was set up in 1987 to support, advise and inform those living with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. We aim to help them live a full, active and positive life. Over 25 years later, we remain the only UK based charity that exclusively represents and supports people with all types of EDS. We run regular events and conferences to bring our community together, and produce literature and merchandise to increase understanding and improve management of the condition. We have over 30 support groups around the country to provide our members with a local peer support network and we hope to expand this

http://www.ehlers-danlos.org

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2015

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Hypermobility" returned 110 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Focal linear elastosis in a patient with joint hypermobility syndrome.
 

Author(s): Barak C Clement, Christopher Forster, Nicholas Logemann

Journal:

 

Focal linear elastosis (FLE) is a benign skin findingcharacterized by hypertrophic linear plaques withabnormal elastic fibers on histology. We present aunique case in which focal linear elastosis occurredin the setting of joint hypermobility syndrome(JHS). Our patient, a 20-year-old ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Identifying lower limb specific and generalised joint hypermobility in adults: validation of the Lower Limb Assessment Score.
 

Author(s): Kaitlin J Meyer, Cliffton Chan, Luke Hopper, Leslie L Nicholson

Journal:

 

The Lower Limb Assessment Score (LLAS) has only been validated in a paediatric population. The aim of this study was to validate the use of the LLAS in an adult population by: i) evaluating its ability to discriminate between different extents of lower limb hypermobility, ii) establishing ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Coexistence of spondyloarthritis and joint hypermobility syndrome: rare or unknown association?
 

Author(s): J B Pinto Carneiro, T Pinto de Souza, T M L Antunes de Oliveira, S L Euzébio Ribeiro

Journal:

 

We report two cases of siblings presenting coexisting non-radiographic axial spondyloartrhritis and joint hypermobility syndrome, complaining of back pain with morning stiffness, enthesitis, peripheral arthralgia, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Hypermobility" returned 15 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hypermobility, the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and chronic pain.
 

Author(s): Delfien Syx, Inge De Wandele, Lies Rombaut, Fransiska Malfait

Journal: Clin. Exp. Rheumatol.. ;35 Suppl 107(5):116-122.

 

Chronic widespread pain is a common complaint among individuals affected by generalised joint hypermobility. In the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, these individuals are usually diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). JHS is a multifactorial trait with ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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When flexibility is not necessarily a virtue: a review of hypermobility syndromes and chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain in children.
 

Author(s): Marco Cattalini, Raju Khubchandani, Rolando Cimaz

Journal:

 

Chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain is a common complaint in children. Among the most common causes for this problem are different conditions associated with hypermobility. Pediatricians and allied professionals should be well aware of the characteristics of the different syndromes ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Hypermobility syndromes from the clinician's perspective: an overview.
 

Author(s): J W Jacobs, José António da Silva

Journal: Acta Reumatol Port. ;39(2):124-36.

 

Symptomatic generalized hypermobility is a frequent occurring condition among patients referred to the rheumatologist or other medical specialist. In a subset of patients, a further classifying diagnosis of a specific syndrome can (and should) be made, based on pattern recognition ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Compression Garments on Hypermobility Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (CGhEDS)
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypermobility Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 27 Feb 2018

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Wearing a Compression Garment for Patients With Hypermobility Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

 

Last Updated: 22 Aug 2017

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The Comorbidity of Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome and Functional Constipation in Children
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Benign Hypermobility Syndrome; Functional Constipation

 

Last Updated: 29 Mar 2017

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