Infective endocarditis

Common Name(s)

Infective endocarditis

Infective endocarditis is an infection of the heart lining, heart valves, or blood vessels. The infection is usually caused by bacteria (bacterial endocarditis) but in some rare cases can be caused by fungus (fungal endocarditis). The risk of endocarditis is greater in individuals with heart conditions that prevent blood from moving correctly through the heart, such as those with congenital heart defects, damaged heart valves, or an implanted heart device. Those who have HIV/AIDS or IV drug users are also at increased risk for developing infective endocarditis.

Symptoms of infective endocarditis include fever, chills, fatigue, and achiness. Later symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath, weight loss, muscle and joint pain, a heart murmur, and small spots of blood under the skin or fingernails. The symptoms of infective endocarditis will typically become more severe over time as the bacteria or fungi continues to grow. It is important to seek treatment if you experience these symptoms. If untreated, endocarditis can be fatal.

Infective endocarditis can often be diagnosed using a physical examination, an ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram), testing of heart rhythm with an EKG, blood cultures to test for bacteria, and an X-ray of the chest. Treatment usually includes IV antibiotics. Good dental hygiene is an important preventative measure, as bacteria from the mouth are likely to enter the bloodstream and can then grow in the heart. Check with your doctor if you think you may be at risk for endocarditis, and you may be given antibiotics to take before a dental procedure. If you have been diagnosed with infective endocarditis, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Infective endocarditis" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Infective endocarditis" returned 980 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii in heart valve tissue from patients with culture-negative infective endocarditis.
 

Author(s): Young-Rock Jang, Joon Seon Song, Choong Eun Jin, Byung-Han Ryu, Se Yoon Park, Sang-Oh Lee, Sang-Ho Choi, Yang Soo Kim, Jun Hee Woo, Jae-Kwan Song, Yong Shin, Sung-Han Kim

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Aug;97(34):e11881.

 

Coxiella burnetii is a common cause of blood culture-negative infective endocarditis (IE). Molecular detection of C burnetii DNA in clinical specimens is a promising method of diagnosing Q fever endocarditis. Here, we examined the diagnostic utility of Q fever polymerase chain reaction ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Detection of spleen, kidney and liver infarcts by abdominal computed tomography does not affect the outcome in patients with left-side infective endocarditis.
 

Author(s): José A Parra, Luis Hernández, Patricia Muñoz, Gerardo Blanco, Regino Rodríguez-Álvarez, Daniel Romeu Vilar, Arístides de Alarcón, Miguel Angel Goenaga, Mar Moreno, María Carmen Fariñas,

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Aug;97(33):e11952.

 

Extra-cardiac abdominal complications are common in left-side infective endocarditis (LS-IE). The aim of this work was to study whether patients with LS-IE presenting splenic, renal, or liver (SRL) involvement seen in abdominal computed tomography (CT) had different clinical features, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Viridans streptococcal infective endocarditis associated with fixed orthodontic appliance managed surgically by mitral valve plasty: A case report.
 

Author(s): Victoria Birlutiu, Rares Mircea Birlutiu, Victor Sebastian Costache

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jul;97(27):e11260.

 

Streptococcus viridans, a heterogeneous group of alpha-hemolytic streptococci, is part of the normal flora of the mouth, usually responsible for dental caries (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis), and pericoronitis, as well as for subacute infective endocarditis. They are ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Infective endocarditis" returned 114 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Infective endocarditis:an emergency well too minimized].
 

Author(s): S Marchetta, R Dulgheru, C Oury, F Frippiat, P Lancellotti

Journal: Rev Med Liege. 2018 May;73(5-6):283-289.

 

Infective endocarditis is a rare disease that can lead to some diagnostic wandering because of its often nonspecific and polymorphic clinical manifestations. This latency is at the origin of severe cardiac and extra-cardiac complications, yet highly fatal. The clinician should always ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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The diagnosis of microorganism involved in infective endocarditis (IE) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR: A systematic review.
 

Author(s): Reza Faraji, Mostafa Behjati-Ardakani, Seyed Mohammad Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mehdi Kalantar, Seyedeh Mahdieh Namayandeh, Mohammadhossien Soltani, Mahmood Emami, Hengameh Zandi, Ali Dehghani Firoozabadi, Mahmood Kazeminasab, Nastaran Ahmadi, Mohammadtaghi Sarebanhassanabadi

Journal: Kaohsiung J. Med. Sci.. 2018 Feb;34(2):71-78.

 

Broad-range bacterial rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing may be identified as the etiology of infective endocarditis (IE) from surgically removed valve tissue; therefore, we reviewed the value of molecular testing in identifying organisms' DNA in the studies ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Probiotics and infective endocarditis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a clinical case and a review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Evangelo Boumis, Alessandro Capone, Vincenzo Galati, Carolina Venditti, Nicola Petrosillo

Journal:

 

In the last decades, probiotics have been widely used as food supplements because of their putative beneficial health effects. They are generally considered safe but rare reports of serious infections caused by bacteria included in the definition of probiotics raise concerns on their ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 13 Mar 2018

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Clinical Metagenomics of Infective Endocarditis
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Infective Endocarditis

 

Last Updated: 22 Jun 2017

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Vancomycin, Gentamycin in Infective Endocarditis
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Infective Endocarditis

 

Last Updated: 26 Sep 2018

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