Juvenile osteoporosis

Common Name(s)

Juvenile osteoporosis

Juvenile osteoporosis is a condition of bone demineralization characterized by pain in the back and extremities, multiple fractures, difficulty walking, and evidence of osteoporosis. Symptoms typically develop just before puberty. Osteoporosis is rare in children and adolescents. When it does occur, it is usually caused by an underlying medical disorder or by medications used to treat the disorder. This is called secondary osteoporosis. Sometimes, however, there is no identifiable cause of osteoporosis in a child. This is known as idiopathic osteoporosis. There is no established medical or surgical therapy for juvenile osteoporosis. In some cases, treatment is not necessary, as the condition resolves spontaneously. Early diagnosis may allow for preventive steps, including physical therapy, avoidance of weight-bearing activities, use of crutches and other supportive care. A well-balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D is also important. In severe, long-lasting cases, medications such as bisphosphonates may be used. In most cases, complete recovery of bone occurs.  
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Juvenile osteoporosis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Juvenile osteoporosis" returned 10 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Evidence of altered matrix composition in iliac crest biopsies from patients with idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis.
 

Author(s): Ignacio Garcia, Vincent Chiodo, Yan Ma, Adele Boskey

Journal: Connect. Tissue Res.. 2016 ;57(1):28-37.

 

Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis (IJO) is a rare condition in children, characterized by bone pain and long bone and vertebral fractures. Previously, IJO bone was solely characterized by histomorphometry and quantitative computed tomography. The goal of this study is to describe IJO ...

Last Updated: 18 Feb 2016

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[Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis].
 

Author(s): M A Guagnelli, D Yeste, M Clemente, A Carrascosa

Journal: An Pediatr (Barc). 2013 Sep;79(3):200-2.

 

Last Updated: 26 Aug 2013

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Osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency, and supplementation in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus: comment on the article by Compeyrot-Lacassagne et al.
 

Author(s): Sonja Praprotnik, Matija Tomsic

Journal: Arthritis Rheum.. 2007 Dec;56(12):4228; author reply 4228-9.

 

Last Updated: 17 Dec 2007

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Juvenile osteoporosis" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Coexistence of familial Mediterranean fever and juvenile idiopathic arthritis with osteoporosis successfully treated with etanercept.
 

Author(s): Sunay Kaya, Ece Kaptanoglu, Hasan Elden, Sami Hizmetli

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2010 ;49(6):619-22.

 

Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent febrile polyserositis and arthritis attacks. Accompanying seronegative spondyloarthropathy has been reported in FMF in addition to its own joint involvement. However, the coexistence of FMF ...

Last Updated: 15 Mar 2010

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.