Middle East respiratory syndrome

Common Name(s)

Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a respiratory illness caused by the MERS-CoV virus. The respiratory tract includes the nose, sinuses, and lungs, as well as many other important structures the body uses to breathe. The first case of MERS was seen in Saudi Arabia, and there have been many reported cases in the countries within and nearby the Arabian Peninsula.

Symptoms of MERS may include fever, chills, cough, trouble breathing, body aches, diarrhea, vomiting, and an upset stomach. Though uncommon, there have been some cases where individuals who are infected with the virus display only very mild or no symptoms. Severe complications may include a rapid deterioration of respiratory function (acute respiratory distress syndrome) and pneumonia. Higher risk individuals that are more likely to become infected include older individuals, those who tend to get sick frequently, pregnant women, children, and those with other long-term diseases such as cancer or diabetes.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) believes the virus originated from an animal source, most likely from camels. Additionally, scientists believe the disease is spread person to person through close contact. However, since many qualities of the virus are not known at this time, further research needs to be completed to fully understand the origin and transmission of the virus.

Ways to prevent becoming infected by the MERS virus include thorough and frequent washing of the hands; avoid touching of the eyes, nose, and mouth; and to avoid contact with individuals who may have been infected or are displaying symptoms. If you or a family member has had possible exposure to the virus and are experiencing symptoms, contact a medical professional as soon as possible to talk about the most current treatment options.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Middle East respiratory syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Middle East respiratory syndrome" returned 316 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Asymptomatic Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus infection using a serologic survey in Korea.
 

Author(s): Yeong-Jun Song, Jeong-Sun Yang, Hee Jung Yoon, Hae-Sung Nam, Soon Young Lee, Hae-Kwan Cheong, Woo-Jung Park, Sung Han Park, Bo Youl Choi, Sung Soon Kim, Moran Ki

Journal:

 

The rates of asymptomatic infection with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus vary. A serologic study was conducted to determine the asymptomatic MERS infection rate in healthcare workers and non-healthcare workers by exposure status.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reduction of soluble dipeptidyl peptidase 4 levels in plasma of patients infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.
 

Author(s): Kyung-Soo Inn, Yuri Kim, Abdimadiyeva Aigerim, Uni Park, Eung-Soo Hwang, Myung-Sik Choi, Yeon-Sook Kim, Nam-Hyuk Cho

Journal: Virology. 2018 05;518():324-327.

 

Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) is a receptor for MERS-CoV. The soluble form of DPP4 (sDPP4) circulates systematically and can competitively inhibit MERS-CoV entry into host cells. Here, we measured the concentration of sDPP4 in the plasma and sputa of 14 MERS-CoV-infected patients ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Event based surveillance of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS- CoV) in Bangladesh among pilgrims and travelers from the Middle East: An update for the period 2013-2016.
 

Author(s): A K M Muraduzzaman, Manjur Hossain Khan, Rezina Parveen, Sharmin Sultana, Ahmed Nawsher Alam, Arifa Akram, Mahmudur Rahman, Tahmina Shirin

Journal:

 

Every year around 150,000 pilgrims from Bangladesh perform Umrah and Hajj. Emergence and continuous reporting of MERS-CoV infection in Saudi Arabia emphasize the need for surveillance of MERS-CoV in returning pilgrims or travelers from the Middle East and capacity building of health ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Middle East respiratory syndrome" returned 32 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Elucidating Transmission Patterns From Internet Reports: Ebola and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome as Case Studies.
 

Author(s): Gerardo Chowell, Julie M Cleaton, Cecile Viboud

Journal: J. Infect. Dis.. 2016 Dec;214(suppl_4):S421-S426.

 

The paucity of traditional epidemiological data during epidemic emergencies calls for alternative data streams to characterize the key features of an outbreak, including the nature of risky exposures, the reproduction number, and transmission heterogeneities. We illustrate the potential ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus vaccines: current status and novel approaches.
 

Author(s): Nisreen Ma Okba, V Stalin Raj, Bart L Haagmans

Journal: Curr Opin Virol. 2017 04;23():49-58.

 

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a cause of severe respiratory infection in humans, specifically the elderly and people with comorbidities. The re-emergence of lethal coronaviruses calls for international collaboration to produce coronavirus vaccines, which ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Middle East respiratory syndrome in children. Dental considerations.
 

Author(s): Fares S Al-Sehaibany

Journal: Saudi Med J. 2017 Apr;38(4):339-343.

 

As of January 2016, 1,633 laboratory-confirmed cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection and 587 MERS-related deaths have been reported by the World Health Organization globally. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus  may occur sporadically ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Safety and Immunogenicity of a Candidate MERS-CoV Vaccine (MERS001)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome)

 

Last Updated: 5 Jun 2018

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MERS-CoV Infection tReated With A Combination of Lopinavir /Ritonavir and Interferon Beta-1b
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

 

Last Updated: 2 Nov 2017

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