Middle East respiratory syndrome

Common Name(s)

Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a respiratory illness caused by the MERS-CoV virus. The respiratory tract includes the nose, sinuses, and lungs, as well as many other important structures the body uses to breathe. The first case of MERS was seen in Saudi Arabia, and there have been many reported cases in the countries within and nearby the Arabian Peninsula.

Symptoms of MERS may include fever, chills, cough, trouble breathing, body aches, diarrhea, vomiting, and an upset stomach. Though uncommon, there have been some cases where individuals who are infected with the virus display only very mild or no symptoms. Severe complications may include a rapid deterioration of respiratory function (acute respiratory distress syndrome) and pneumonia. Higher risk individuals that are more likely to become infected include older individuals, those who tend to get sick frequently, pregnant women, children, and those with other long-term diseases such as cancer or diabetes.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) believes the virus originated from an animal source, most likely from camels. Additionally, scientists believe the disease is spread person to person through close contact. However, since many qualities of the virus are not known at this time, further research needs to be completed to fully understand the origin and transmission of the virus.

Ways to prevent becoming infected by the MERS virus include thorough and frequent washing of the hands; avoid touching of the eyes, nose, and mouth; and to avoid contact with individuals who may have been infected or are displaying symptoms. If you or a family member has had possible exposure to the virus and are experiencing symptoms, contact a medical professional as soon as possible to talk about the most current treatment options.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Middle East respiratory syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Middle East respiratory syndrome" returned 264 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Two deletion variants of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus found in a patient with characteristic symptoms.
 

Author(s): Qian Xie, Yujuan Cao, Juan Su, Jie Wu, Xianbo Wu, Chengsong Wan, Mingliang He, Changwen Ke, Bao Zhang, Wei Zhao

Journal: Arch. Virol.. 2017 08;162(8):2445-2449.

 

Significant sequence variation of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) has never been detected since it was first reported in 2012. A MERS patient came from Korea to China in late May 2015. The patient was 44 years old and had symptoms including high fever, dry ...

Last Updated: 19 Apr 2017

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Clinical and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Spreaders of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus during the 2015 Outbreak in Korea.
 

Author(s): Chang Kyung Kang, Kyoung Ho Song, Pyoeng Gyun Choe, Wan Beom Park, Ji Hwan Bang, Eu Suk Kim, Sang Won Park, Hong Bin Kim, Nam Joong Kim, Sung Il Cho, Jong Koo Lee, Myoung Don Oh

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2017 May;32(5):744-749.

 

Nosocomial transmission is an important characteristic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. Risk factors for transmission of MERS-CoV in healthcare settings are not well defined. During the Korean outbreak in 2015, 186 patients had laboratory-confirmed ...

Last Updated: 5 Apr 2017

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Worry experienced during the 2015 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) pandemic in Korea.
 

Author(s): Jun-Soo Ro, Jin-Seok Lee, Sung-Chan Kang, Hye-Min Jung

Journal:

 

Korea failed in its risk communication during the early stage of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) outbreak; consequently, it faced difficulties in managing MERS, while disease-related worry increased. Disease-related worry can help disease prevention and management, but ...

Last Updated: 8 Mar 2017

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Middle East respiratory syndrome" returned 27 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Clinical determinants of the severity of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS): a systematic review and meta-analysis.
 

Author(s): Ryota Matsuyama, Hiroshi Nishiura, Satoshi Kutsuna, Kayoko Hayakawa, Norio Ohmagari

Journal:

 

While the risk of severe complications of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and its determinants have been explored in previous studies, a systematic analysis of published articles with different designs and populations has yet to be conducted. The present study aimed to systematically ...

Last Updated: 30 Nov 2016

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Assessment of the risk posed to Singapore by the 2015 Middle East respiratory syndrome outbreak in the Republic of Korea.
 

Author(s): Emma Xuxiao Zhang, Olivia Seen Huey Oh, Wanhan See, Pream Raj, Lyn James, Kamran Khan, Jeannie Su Hui Tey

Journal:

 

To assess the public health risk to Singapore posed by the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in the Republic of Korea in 2015.

Last Updated: 10 Aug 2016

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Prevalence of comorbidities in the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): a systematic review and meta-analysis.
 

Author(s): Alaa Badawi, Seung Gwan Ryoo

Journal: Int. J. Infect. Dis.. 2016 Aug;49():129-33.

 

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with life-threatening severe illnesses and a mortality rate of approximately 35%, particularly in patients with underlying comorbidities. A systematic analysis of 637 MERS-CoV cases suggests that diabetes and ...

Last Updated: 6 Aug 2016

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

MERS-CoV Infection tReated With A Combination of Lopinavir /Ritonavir and Interferon Beta-1b
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

 

Last Updated: 28 Nov 2016

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