Anomic aphasia

Common Name(s)

Anomic aphasia, Dysnomia, Nominal aphasia, Amnesic aphasia

Anomic aphasia, also known as dysnomia, nominal aphasia, and amnesic aphasia, is a disorder that causes a person to have trouble remembering words and names. People with anomic aphasia will look at an object, such as a cup, and know what it is and what it is used for, but not be able to remember the word “cup” and call it that. When this is the case, people with anomic aphasia will call the cup “something that holds water”. This can also occur when the person can not remember another individual’s name, and will describe what they look like rather than saying their name. There are three main types of anomia, word selection anomia, semantic anomia, and disconnection anomia. Word selection anomia means that the person will see an object but not be able to remember what it is called. Semantic anomia is when a person can not remember the meaning of a word. Disconnection anomia occurs when a person can not name an object when it is presented to them in a specific way. For example, a person may touch an orange and be able to remember that it is called an orange. However, if they only see the orange but can not touch it they may not be able to remember what it is called. Talk with your doctor to find the best treatment for you if you have been diagnosed with anomic aphasia.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Anomic aphasia" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Anomic aphasia" returned 2 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Sensory-specific anomic aphasia following left occipital lesions: data from free oral descriptions of concrete word meanings.
 

Author(s): F Mårtensson, M Roll, M Lindgren, P Apt, M Horne

Journal: Neurocase. 2014 Apr;20(2):192-207.

 

The present study investigated hierarchical lexical semantic structure in oral descriptions of concrete word meanings produced by a subject (ZZ) diagnosed with anomic aphasia due to left occipital lesions. The focus of the analysis was production of a) nouns at different levels of ...

Last Updated: 10 Dec 2013

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Pure anomic aphasia caused by a subcortical hemorrhage in the left temporo-parieto-occipital lobe.
 

Author(s): M Takeda, H Tachibana, N Shibuya, Y Nakajima, B Okuda, M Sugita, H Tanaka

Journal: Intern. Med.. 1999 Mar;38(3):293-5.

 

There have been few case reports of pure anomic aphasia and the underlying mechanism remains to be clarified. We report a patient in whom pure anomic aphasia was caused by subcortical hemorrhage in the left temporo-parieto-occipital lobe. Based on magnetic resonance images and cerebral ...

Last Updated: 12 Jul 1999

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Anomic aphasia" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Pairing Word Retrieval and Physical Endurance Tasks to Treat Anomia in People With Aphasia
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Aphasia

 

Last Updated: 25 Oct 2017

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Rehabilitation and Prophylaxis of Anomia in Primary Progressive Aphasia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Aphasia, Primary Progressive; Anomia; Alzheimer Disease

 

Last Updated: 19 Oct 2017

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Language Assessment and Treatment Following Acquired Brain Injury
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Brain Injuries

 

Last Updated: 26 Oct 2017

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