Osteomalacia

Common Name(s)

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia is a disease that causes softening of the bones in adults. When this disease occurs in children, it is known as rickets. Soft bones are much more prone to breaking or bending than hardened bones. This leads to increased risk of broken bones (fractures) and increased risk of falls, especially in older adults. Vitamin D deficiency is usually the cause of osteomalacia. Our bodies need vitamin D to absorb calcium from the foods we eat. Without vitamin D, our bodies do not get enough calcium for our bones and this causes the bones to become softened.

There are usually no symptoms in the early stages of osteomalacia. However, changes in the bones can usually be seen on x-ray images. As the disease progresses, symptoms include dull, aching bone pain and muscle weakness. Osteomalacia occurs as a result of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency can develop as a result of surgery to the stomach or small intestine, disorders of the kidneys or liver, celiac disease, and some drugs used to treat seizures. People who have a lack of vitamin D in their diets or who have very little exposure to sunlight are also at risk for osteomalacia, as well as those of South Asian origin.

Osteomalacia is most often diagnosed through x-ray imaging, blood tests, or a bone biopsy. Treatment for osteomalacia involves increasing vitamin D and calcium intake, sometimes in the form of dietary supplements. Support groups are available as a resource for more information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Osteomalacia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 294 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A case report of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-induced osteomalacia.
 

Author(s): Weiqian Wu, Chongyang Wang, Jianwei Ruan, Feng Chen, Ningjun Li, Fanghu Chen

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(51):e9470.

 

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and often misdiagnosed syndrome. Surgical resection is currently the first line treatment for TIO.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A case of osteomalacia due to deranged mineral balance caused by saccharated ferric oxide and short-bowel syndrome: A case report.
 

Author(s): Hiroshi Nomoto, Hideaki Miyoshi, Akinobu Nakamura, So Nagai, Naoyuki Kitao, Chikara Shimizu, Tatsuya Atsumi

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Sep;96(39):e8147.

 

Saccharated ferric oxide has been shown to lead to elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23, hypophosphatemia, and, consequently, osteomalacia. Moreover, mineral imbalance is often observed in patients with short-bowel syndrome to some degree.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Treatment and outcomes of tumor-induced osteomalacia associated with phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors: retrospective review of 12 patients.
 

Author(s): Qing-Yao Zuo, Hong Wang, Wei Li, Xiao-Hui Niu, Yan-Hong Huang, Jia Chen, Yu-Hua You, Bao-Yue Liu, Ai-Min Cui, Wei Deng

Journal:

 

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by severe hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Nonspecific symptoms make the diagnosis elusive. In addition, locating the responsible tumor(s) is challenging. The aim of this study was to investigate the ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 22 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Nutritional Rickets and Osteomalacia in the Twenty-first Century: Revised Concepts, Public Health, and Prevention Strategies.
 

Author(s): Suma Uday, Wolfgang Högler

Journal: Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2017 08;15(4):293-302.

 

Nutritional rickets and osteomalacia are common in dark-skinned and migrant populations. Their global incidence is rising due to changing population demographics, failing prevention policies and missing implementation strategies. The calcium deprivation spectrum has hypocalcaemic ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT in Recurrent Skull-Base Phosphaturic Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Osteomalacia: A Potential Application of PRRT Beyond Neuroendocrine Tumors.
 

Author(s): Sandip Basu, Preeti Fargose

Journal: J Nucl Med Technol. 2016 Dec;44(4):248-250.

 

The potential of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is described in a case of recurrent inoperable phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor causing osteomalacia in the left basiocciput, for which the patient had undergone surgery twice previously. After one cycle of PRRT, there was ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Tumour-induced osteomalacia: a literature review and a case report.
 

Author(s): Jolanta Dadoniene, Marius Miglinas, Dalia Miltiniene, Donatas Vajauskas, Dmitrij Seinin, Petras Butenas, Tomas Kacergius

Journal:

 

Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterised by severe hypophosphataemia and osteomalacia, with renal phosphate wasting that occurs in association with tumour. The epidemiology likewise aetiology is not known. The clinical presentation of TIO includes ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

BGJ398 for the Treatment of Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia

 

Last Updated: 22 May 2018

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Observing the Changes of Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 in Patients of Tumor Induced Osteomalacia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Hypophosphatemia

 

Last Updated: 4 Jul 2016

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Evaluation and Treatment of Skeletal Diseases
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor Induced Osteomalcia; Osteomalacia; Familial Tumoral Calcinosis

 

Last Updated: 18 May 2018

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