Osteomalacia

Common Name(s)

Osteomalacia

Osteomalacia is a disease that causes softening of the bones in adults. When this disease occurs in children, it is known as rickets. Soft bones are much more prone to breaking or bending than hardened bones. This leads to increased risk of broken bones (fractures) and increased risk of falls, especially in older adults. Vitamin D deficiency is usually the cause of osteomalacia. Our bodies need vitamin D to absorb calcium from the foods we eat. Without vitamin D, our bodies do not get enough calcium for our bones and this causes the bones to become softened.

There are usually no symptoms in the early stages of osteomalacia. However, changes in the bones can usually be seen on x-ray images. As the disease progresses, symptoms include dull, aching bone pain and muscle weakness. Osteomalacia occurs as a result of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency can develop as a result of surgery to the stomach or small intestine, disorders of the kidneys or liver, celiac disease, and some drugs used to treat seizures. People who have a lack of vitamin D in their diets or who have very little exposure to sunlight are also at risk for osteomalacia, as well as those of South Asian origin.

Osteomalacia is most often diagnosed through x-ray imaging, blood tests, or a bone biopsy. Treatment for osteomalacia involves increasing vitamin D and calcium intake, sometimes in the form of dietary supplements. Support groups are available as a resource for more information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Osteomalacia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 295 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Sjögren's Syndrome Associated with Fanconi's Syndrome and Osteomalacia.
 

Author(s): Jorge O Gutierrez, Maria F Zurita, Luis A Zurita

Journal:

 

BACKGROUND Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, which is also known as sicca syndrome, due to the symptoms of dry eyes and dry mouth, and is associated with other connective tissue diseases and autoimmune diseases. Sjögren's syndrome can also be associated ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Occult phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour of femur cortex causing oncogenic osteomalacia - diagnostic challenges and clinical outcomes.
 

Author(s): Deep Dutta, Raghuvansh Kumar Pandey, Rakhee Gogoi, Nagender Solanki, Renu Madan, Anupam Mondal, Shruti Dogra, Pradeep Thapa

Journal: Endokrynol Pol. 2018 ;69(2):205-210.

 

Tumor induced osteomalacia (TIO) are extremely rare paraneoplastic syndrome with less than 300 reported cases. This report highlights the pitfalls and challenges in diagnosing and localizing TIO in patients with refractory and resistant osteomalacia.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A case report of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-induced osteomalacia.
 

Author(s): Weiqian Wu, Chongyang Wang, Jianwei Ruan, Feng Chen, Ningjun Li, Fanghu Chen

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(51):e9470.

 

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and often misdiagnosed syndrome. Surgical resection is currently the first line treatment for TIO.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Osteomalacia" returned 23 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Definitive surgical treatment of osteomalacia induced by skull base tumor and determination of the half-life of serum fibroblast growth factor 23.
 

Author(s): Taijun Hana, Shota Tanaka, Hirofumi Nakatomi, Masaaki Shojima, Seiji Fukumoto, Masako Ikemura, Nobuhito Saito

Journal: Endocr. J.. 2017 Oct;64(10):1033-1039.

 

Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome often associated with fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23)-producing tumors such as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue variant (PMTMCT) affecting the bone and soft tissue. We experienced a patient ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Nutritional Rickets and Osteomalacia in the Twenty-first Century: Revised Concepts, Public Health, and Prevention Strategies.
 

Author(s): Suma Uday, Wolfgang Högler

Journal: Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2017 08;15(4):293-302.

 

Nutritional rickets and osteomalacia are common in dark-skinned and migrant populations. Their global incidence is rising due to changing population demographics, failing prevention policies and missing implementation strategies. The calcium deprivation spectrum has hypocalcaemic ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT in Recurrent Skull-Base Phosphaturic Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Osteomalacia: A Potential Application of PRRT Beyond Neuroendocrine Tumors.
 

Author(s): Sandip Basu, Preeti Fargose

Journal: J Nucl Med Technol. 2016 Dec;44(4):248-250.

 

The potential of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is described in a case of recurrent inoperable phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor causing osteomalacia in the left basiocciput, for which the patient had undergone surgery twice previously. After one cycle of PRRT, there was ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 7 Nov 2018

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BGJ398 for the Treatment of Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia

 

Last Updated: 9 Nov 2018

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Evaluation and Treatment of Skeletal Diseases
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor Induced Osteomalcia; Osteomalacia; Familial Tumoral Calcinosis

 

Last Updated: 19 Sep 2018

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