Partial atrioventricular septal defect

Common Name(s)

Partial atrioventricular septal defect

A partial atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) is a type of heart defect that is present at birth (congenital). Normally, the four heart chambers are separated by walls (septum) to keep oxygen rich and oxygen poor blood separate. The blood flow is controlled by valves. In partial AVSD, the hole is located in the wall between the top two chambers of the heart (atrium). The mitral valve (between the left atrium and ventricle) may leak. The oxygen rich and poor blood mixes due to these defects which causes the heart to send too much blood to the lungs. The overworked heart enlarges and the blood pressure in the lungs becomes too high. AVSD may eventually lead to heart failure, though this is less common in partial compared to complete AVSD.

Common symptoms may include difficulty breathing, abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmia), and poor blood circulation, which can cause bluish lips and skin and swelling in the legs (edema). Children with AVSD may also have poor appetite and tire easily. Partial AVSD is usually diagnosed during the first year of life. The causes of AVSDs are believed to be a combination of genetics and environment. Babies with Down syndrome are at an increased risk to develop this condition. Other risk factors include drinking alcohol during pregnancy or poorly controlled maternal diabetes.

Doctors may hear a swishing sound in the heartbeat (a murmur) when listening with a stethoscope. Tests used to confirm an AVSD may include a chest X-ray, electrocardiogram (EKG) (tests the electrical impulses), echocardiogram (using sound waves to create a picture), or cardiac MRI.

Smaller defects may close on their own, but the most common treatment is surgical repair. If your baby or child has been diagnosed with an AVSD, talk to their pediatric cardiologist about the most current treatment options. Support organizations and genetic counselors are also a good source of information and can help connect you with others affected by AVSD.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Partial atrioventricular septal defect" for support, advocacy or research.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Partial atrioventricular septal defect" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Partial atrioventricular septal defect" returned 12 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Accessory Mitral Valve Leaflet Causing Severe Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in a Preterm Neonate with a Partial Atrioventricular Septal Defect.
 

Author(s): J Kevin Wilkes, Charles D Fraser, Thomas J Seery

Journal:

 

Atrioventricular septal defects represent a class of congenital cardiac malformations that vary in presentation and management strategy depending upon the severity of the particular lesions present. We present the case of a premature neonate who had a partial atrioventricular septal ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Partial and transitional atrioventricular septal defect outcomes.
 

Author(s): L LuAnn Minich, Andrew M Atz, Steven D Colan, Lynn A Sleeper, Seema Mital, James Jaggers, Renee Margossian, Ashwin Prakash, Jennifer S Li, Meryl S Cohen, Ronald V Lacro, Gloria L Klein, John A Hawkins,

Journal: Ann. Thorac. Surg.. 2010 Feb;89(2):530-6.

 

Surgical and perioperative improvements permit earlier repair of partial and transitional atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD). We sought to describe contemporary outcomes in a multicenter cohort.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Partial atrioventricular septal defect in the fetus: diagnostic features and associations in a multicenter series of 30 cases.
 

Author(s): D Paladini, P Volpe, G Sglavo, M G Russo, V De Robertis, I Penner, C Nappi

Journal: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Sep;34(3):268-73.

 

To assess the anatomical features and the associations of partial atrioventricular septal defect (pAVSD) in the fetus.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Partial atrioventricular septal defect" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[The ostium primum or partial atrioventricular septal defect].
 

Author(s): M A Radermecker, R Fontaine, R Limet

Journal: Rev Med Liege. 2007 Jan;62(1):25-8.

 

Often assimilated to simple inter-atrial communication, the ostium primum, or partial atrio-ventricular septal defect, is an entity that is characterized by a different embryological mechanism and requires some specific surgical expertise. Basically, knowledge of the morphology of ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.