Parvovirus antenatal infection

Common Name(s)

Parvovirus antenatal infection

Parvovirus antenatal infections occur when a fetus becomes infected with the human parvovirus through its mother during the pregnancy. This infection can lead to serious health problems for the fetus, most often severe anemia. Anemia is a condition where red blood cells are used up faster than your body can replace them, which causes a lack of oxygen in the bloodstream. This severe anemia caused by the infection can lead to miscarriage or stillbirth. Treatment options include a direct blood transfusion to the fetus as well as specific medication for the mother that can pass through the placenta to the fetus.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Parvovirus antenatal infection" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Parvovirus antenatal infection" returned 3 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The magnitude and correlates of Parvovirus B19 infection among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Mwanza, Tanzania.
 

Author(s): Mariam M Mirambo, Fatma Maliki, Mtebe Majigo, Martha F Mushi, Nyambura Moremi, Jeremiah Seni, Dismas Matovelo, Stephen E Mshana

Journal:

 

Human parvovirus B19 (B19) infection has been associated with congenital infection which may result into a number of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. The epidemiology and the magnitude of B19 infections among pregnant women have been poorly studied in developing countries. This study ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Parvovirus B19 antibodies and correlates of infection in pregnant women attending an antenatal clinic in central Nigeria.
 

Author(s): Samuel E Emiasegen, Lohya Nimzing, Moses P Adoga, Adamu Y Ohagenyi, Rufai Lekan

Journal: Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz. 2011 Mar;106(2):227-31.

 

Human parvovirus B19 infection is associated with spontaneous abortion, hydrops foetalis, intrauterine foetal death, erythema infectiosum (5th disease), aplastic crisis and acute symmetric polyarthropathy. However, data concerning Nigerian patients with B19 infection have not been ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Small bowel atresia: antenatal intestinal vascular accident or parvovirus B19 infection?
 

Author(s): R L Schild, M Hansmann

Journal: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Mar;11(3):227.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Parvovirus antenatal infection" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.