Peripheral artery disease

Common Name(s)

Peripheral artery disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition where the legs and/or arms do not receive enough blood. This condition develops most commonly in the legs and is usually caused by a buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries leading to the legs. Eventually, these deposits may result in narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis) putting the affected individual at risk for a heart attack or stroke. Other less common causes of PAD include inflammation (including swelling) of the arteries, certain leg injuries, certain problems with ligaments or muscles in the legs, and radiation exposure.

Individuals with PAD often feel pain while walking (intermittent claudication). Other symptoms include leg cramping, leg numbness or weakness, one leg feeling colder than the other, sores that don’t heal quickly, hair loss on legs, slow growing toenails, and skin that can be shiny or a different color.

The largest risk factor is smoking. Diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, aging, a family history, and high levels of a protein called homocysteine also increase your risk for developing PAD.

A diagnosis can be made in several ways. Your doctor may conduct a physical exam, perform an ultrasound, look at your blood vessels by injecting dye into them (angiography), or run blood tests. An ankle-brachial index (ABI) test may also be used to compare the blood pressure levels in your arms and legs. Some people with PAD can be treated with simple lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, and eating healthy. In more severe cases, your doctor may prescribe certain medications or recommend surgery to stop the atherosclerosis from getting worse. Research is ongoing, so if you have been diagnosed with PAD, talk with your doctor and specialists about the most current treatment options. Support groups are good sources of information and can help connect you with others living with PAD.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Peripheral artery disease" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Peripheral artery disease" returned 476 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Combination of the ankle-brachial index and percentage of mean arterial pressure to improve diagnostic sensitivity for peripheral artery disease: An observational study.
 

Author(s): Han-Wei Lin, I-Te Lee

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Sep;97(39):e12644.

 

The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a noninvasive method for screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD). However, false-negative findings of the ABI may limit its clinical use. The percentage of mean arterial pressure (%MAP) calculated from pulse volume recording has been reported ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Results of 5-year follow-up study in patients with peripheral artery disease treated with PL-VEGF165 for intermittent claudication.
 

Author(s): Roman Deev, Igor Plaksa, Ilia Bozo, Nina Mzhavanadze, Igor Suchkov, Yuriy Chervyakov, Ilia Staroverov, Roman Kalinin, Artur Isaev

Journal: Ther Adv Cardiovasc Dis. 2018 Sep;12(9):237-246.

 

The effective treatment of chronic lower limb ischemia is one of the most challenging issues confronting vascular surgeons. Current pharmacological therapies play an auxiliary role and cannot prevent disease progression, and new treatment methods are needed. In 2011, a plasmid VEGF65-gene ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Epidemiology of lower extremity peripheral artery disease in veterans.
 

Author(s): James Willey, Amgad Mentias, Mary Vaughan-Sarrazin, Kimberly McCoy, Gary Rosenthal, Saket Girotra

Journal: J. Vasc. Surg.. 2018 08;68(2):527-535.e5.

 

The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology, clinical features, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in veterans with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Peripheral artery disease" returned 70 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging for peripheral artery disease.
 

Author(s): Roshin C Mathew, Christopher M Kramer

Journal: Vasc Med. 2018 04;23(2):143-152.

 

The global burden of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is significant. This has led to numerous recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in PAD. Older techniques such as time of flight MRI or phase contrast MRI are burdened by long acquisition times and significant ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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PCSK9 inhibition for LDL lowering and beyond - implications for patients with peripheral artery disease.
 

Author(s): Katrin Gebauer, Holger Reinecke

Journal: VASA. 2018 Apr;47(3):165-176.

 

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been proven to be a causal factor of atherosclerosis and, along with other triggers like inflammation, the most frequent reason for peripheral arterial disease. Moreover, a linear correlation between LDL-C concentration and cardiovascular ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Antithrombotic therapy in peripheral artery disease: A review of the EUCLID trial results and current ongoing trials.
 

Author(s): Rachael Ward, Chandler Long, Manesh R Patel, William S Jones

Journal: Clin Cardiol. 2018 Jan;41(1):137-143.

 

In addition to risk-factor modification, antithrombotic therapy is the hallmark of management to reduce cardiovascular ischemic events in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Currently, the guidelines recommend long-term antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel in ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

SHOWME-PAD (Peripheral Artery Disease)
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Peripheral Artery Disease

 

Last Updated: 14 Jun 2017

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Daily Step-based Exercise Using Fitness Monitors for Peripheral Artery Disease
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Peripheral Artery Disease

 

Last Updated: 14 Nov 2017

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