Posterior tibial tendon rupture

Common Name(s)

Posterior tibial tendon rupture

A posterior tibial tendon rupture is a tear of the posterior tibial tendon. This particular tendon connects the calf muscle to the bones on the inside of the foot. The posterior tibial tendon normally functions to provide stability and support near the arch of the foot. Individuals with a tear in this tendon will often experience flat feet.

A ruptured tendon is caused by traumatic injury. The injury may be caused by one severe, damaging motion, such as a fall, or by repetitive stress causing gradual tearing, such as long-term involvement in sports that place excess stress on the tendon. As the tendon becomes irritated and tears, the arch of the foot will collapse. Posterior tibial tendon rupture occurs more frequently in women than in men, and more often in individuals over the age of 40. Other risk factors include being overweight, having diabetes, or having high blood pressure.

Individuals with a damaged posterior tibial tendon may notice the injury immediately, or may begin to notice more subtle signs of damage over time. Swelling of the foot and ankle, changes in the shape of the foot, abnormal motion tests, and abnormal flexibility tests may be signs of the tendon tearing. Doctors will use medical imaging to look at the bone and muscle structure in the foot in order to diagnose the condition

Treatment for posterior tibial tendon ruptures depends on the severity of the injury. Rest, ice and devices, such as casts or braces, may help promote healing. Medication such as anti-inflammatories and steroids may be used for pain relief during treatment. In some cases, surgery may be indicated to decrease the severity of the flatfoot and pain and increase range of motion. However, recovery from surgery may take up to 12 months and often includes physical therapy to strengthen the tendon. If you or your child has ruptured the posterior tibial tendon, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Posterior tibial tendon rupture" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Posterior tibial tendon rupture" returned 4 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Traumatic rupture of the posterior tibial tendon occurring during a closed fracture of the ankle: report of a case].
 

Author(s): Mohamed Amine Karabila, Mohamed Azouz, Younes Mhamdi, Ismail Hmouri, Mohamed Kharmaz, Ahmed Bardouni, Abdou Lahlou, Mustapha Mahfoud, Mohamed Saleh Berrada

Journal:

 

Last Updated: 29 Mar 2016

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Changes in histoanatomical distribution of types I, III and V collagen promote adaptative remodeling in posterior tibial tendon rupture.
 

Author(s): Erika Satomi, Walcy R Teodoro, Edwin R Parra, TĂșlio D Fernandes, Ana Paula P Velosa, Vera Luiza Capelozzi, Natalino Hajime Yoshinari

Journal: Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2008 Feb;63(1):9-14.

 

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common cause of adult flat foot deformity, and its etiology is unknown.

Last Updated: 25 Feb 2008

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Posterior tibial tendon rupture--a brief report.
 

Author(s): E A Welton, J H Patrick

Journal: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 1989 Mar;71(2):144.

 

Last Updated: 24 May 1989

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Posterior tibial tendon rupture" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.