Rat bite fever

Common Name(s)

Rat bite fever

Rat-bite fever (RBF) is an infectious disease caused by two types of bacteria: Streptobacillus moniliformis in North America, known as streptobacillary RBF, and Spirillum minus mainly in Asia, known as spirillary RBF. People can get RBF from bites or scratches from infected rodents, handling rodents with the disease, or consuming food or drink contaminated with the bacteria. RBF is not spread from person to person. People who may be at increased risk include those who live in rat-infested buildings, have pet rats, or work with rats in laboratories or pet stores. Symptoms of streptobacillary RBF include fever, vomiting, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, and rash. These symptoms usually occur 3-10 days after exposure to an infected rodent, and within 2-4 days after the onset of fever, a rash with small bumps may appear on the hands and feet. Symptoms of spirillary RBF (also called sodoku) vary but often include fever, development of an ulcer at the bite wound, swelling near the wound, swollen lymph nodes, and a rash. Without treatment, RBF can be serious and potentially fatal.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Rat bite fever" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Rat bite fever" returned 23 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acute Tetraplegia Caused by Rat Bite Fever in Snake Keeper and Transmission of Streptobacillus moniliformis.
 

Author(s): Tobias Eisenberg, Simon Poignant, Youenn Jouan, Ahmad Fawzy, Werner Nicklas, Christa Ewers, Laurent Mereghetti, Antoine Guillon

Journal: Emerging Infect. Dis.. 2017 04;23(4):719-721.

 

We report acute tetraplegia caused by rat bite fever in a 59-year old man (snake keeper) and transmission of Streptobacillus moniliformis. We found an identical characteristic bacterial pattern in rat and human samples, which validated genotyping-based evidence for infection with ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A Case Study of Rat Bite Fever Caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis.
 

Author(s): Yasue Hayakawa, Jun Suzuki, Masahiro Suzuki, Wataru Sugiura, Kiyofumi Ohkusu

Journal: Jpn. J. Infect. Dis.. 2017 May;70(3):323-325.

 

We report a case of rat bite fever, diagnosed based on positive cultures of Streptobacillus moniliformis from blood and synovial fluid. The patient was a 45-year-old man who presented with history of a rat bite and alcoholic liver cirrhosis. He had been bitten on his third finger ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Notes from the field: fatal rat-bite fever in a child - San Diego County, California, 2013.
 

Author(s): Jessica K Adam, Aiden K Varan, Alice L Pong, Eric C McDonald,

Journal: MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep.. 2014 Dec;63(50):1210-1.

 

In August 2013, the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency was notified of a fatal case of rat-bite fever (RBF) in a previously healthy male, aged 10 years, who owned pet rats. Two days before his death, the patient experienced rigors, fevers, vomiting, headaches, and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Rat bite fever" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Approved and novel strategies in diagnostics of rat bite fever and other Streptobacillus infections in humans and animals.
 

Author(s): Tobias Eisenberg, Christa Ewers, Jörg Rau, Valerij Akimkin, Werner Nicklas

Journal: Virulence. 2016 Aug;7(6):630-48.

 

Rat bite fever (RBF), a worldwide occurring and most likely under-diagnosed zoonosis caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis, represents the most prominent disease of Streptobacillus infections. Recently, novel members have been described, from which a reservoir in rats and other animal ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Streptobacillus moniliformis septic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from rat-bite fever?
 

Author(s): Teresa K F Wang, Samson S Y Wong

Journal:

 

Streptobacillus moniliformis is a zoonotic agent associated with rodent contacts. Although it is more commonly reported to cause rat-bite fever with reactive arthritides, it can also lead to pyogenic infection of the joints.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Rat bite fever and Streptobacillus moniliformis.
 

Author(s): Sean P Elliott

Journal: Clin. Microbiol. Rev.. 2007 Jan;20(1):13-22.

 

Rat bite fever, caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis, is a systemic illness classically characterized by fever, rigors, and polyarthralgias. If left untreated, it carries a mortality rate of 10%. Unfortunately, its nonspecific initial presentation combined with difficulties in culturing ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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