Reed syndrome

Common Name(s)

Reed syndrome

Reed syndrome, also called multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis (MCUL or MCUL1), is a genetic condition in which people develop benign (non-cancerous) tumors containing smooth muscle tissue (leiomyomas) in the skin and, if female, also in the uterus. In some families aggressive kidney cancer also occurs as part of the complex and is termed as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRRC). The complex is often referred to as MCUL/HLRRC (multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis/hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer) in the medical literature. The cause of both MCUL and HLRCC is a gene called fumarate hydratase (FH), an enzyme involved in the making of energy for the body. MCUL is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, which means that a person needs to inherit only one mutated copy of the FH gene to have symptoms of the condition. The symptoms vary from person to person, even within a family. Treatment is based on the person's specific symptoms.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Reed syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Reed syndrome" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Occurrence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome in classical Hodgkin lymphoma is closely related to the induction of c-mip in Hodgkin-Reed Sternberg cells and podocytes.
 

Author(s): Vincent Audard, Shao-yu Zhang, Christiane Copie-Bergman, Catherine Rucker-Martin, Virginie Ory, Marina Candelier, Maryse Baia, Philippe Lang, André Pawlak, Djillali Sahali

Journal: Blood. 2010 May;115(18):3756-62.

 

It is currently considered that idiopathic minimal change nephrotic syndrome is an immune-mediated glomerular disease. Its association with classical Hodgkin lymphoma minimal change nephrotic syndrome (cHL-MCNS) suggests a molecular link, which remains to be elucidated. We analyzed ...

Last Updated: 7 May 2010

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

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The terms "Reed syndrome" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Vandetanib in Combination With Metformin in People With HLRCC or SDH-Associated Kidney Cancer or Sporadic Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Renal Cell Carcinoma; Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma, Sporadic

 

Last Updated: 30 Jun 2017

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