Rhabdomyolysis

Common Name(s)

Rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis is the breakdown of muscle and the release of muscle cell contents into the bloodstream. Rhabdomyolysis can be caused by genetic or environmental factors. Environmental factors that may cause rhabdomyolysis include crushing trauma, long surgeries, extreme temperatures, or severe muscle strain such as after a marathon or other athletic event. Other causes include severe dehydration, infection, drug use, and seizures. Genetic disorders such as those causing a reduction in muscle enzymes may also lead to rhabdomyolysis. The risk of rhabdomyolysis may be reduced by proper hydration after workout or injury.

Affected individuals may notice dark red or brown urine due to the excretion of muscle breakdown products. Other symptoms of rhabdomyolysis include vomiting, confusion, muscle aches, weakness, low blood pressure, and a rapid heart rate. In severe cases, complications such as permanent kidney damage may occur.

While some individuals may experience the symptoms described above, milder cases are often asymptomatic and later discovered on blood tests. Medications may be used to regulate urine output, and fluid may be given to restore electrolyte levels and prevent shock and kidney damage. Dialysis may be required to remove muscle breakdown products from the blood in individuals with poor kidney function. If you or your child has been diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis, talk to your doctor about the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Rhabdomyolysis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Rhabdomyolysis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Rhabdomyolysis" returned 557 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Rhabdomyolysis following status epilepticus with hyperuricemia: A case report and literature review.
 

Author(s): Lingxing Wang, Shanyan Hong, Honghong Huang, Meili Yang

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jun;97(26):e11281.

 

Rhabdomyolysis owing to status epilepticus (SE) can be life-threating, with acute kidney injury (AKI) the most serious complication; therefore, early recognition of the risk factors is important. Hyperuricemia after epileptic seizures has been reported, and severe hyperuricemia can ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Sciatic neuropathy and rhabdomyolysis after carbon monoxide intoxication: A case report.
 

Author(s): Hyeok Dong Lee, Sung Young Lee, Young-Shin Cho, Seung Hoon Han, Si-Bog Park, Kyu Hoon Lee

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jun;97(23):e11051.

 

Peripheral neuropathy is a rare complication of carbon monoxide intoxication. Peripheral neuropathy following carbon monoxide intoxication is known to completely recover within a few months.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Case report: lactic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis during telbivudine and tenofovir treatment for chronic hepatitis B.
 

Author(s): Yue Ying, Yue-Kai Hu, Jia-Lin Jin, Ji-Ming Zhang, Wen-Hong Zhang, Yu-Xian Huang

Journal:

 

Current treatment options for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are pegylated interferon alpha and nucleoside analogues (NAs). NAs have relatively fewer side effects than interferon alpha, and generally well tolerated. Previously 12.9% of patients on telbivudine treatment were reported to ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Rhabdomyolysis" returned 52 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Fenofibrate monotherapy-induced rhabdomyolysis in a patient with hypothyroidism: A rare case report and literature review.
 

Author(s): Dawei Wang, Yanqiu Wang

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Apr;97(14):e0318.

 

Fenofibrate is a fibric acid derivative indicated for use in hypertriglyceridemia and mixed dyslipidemia treatment among adults. Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by muscle necrosis and the release of intracellular muscle contents into the systemic circulation, which is the ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
A Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess presenting with myasthenia and tea-colored urine: A case report and review of 77 cases of bacterial rhabdomyolysis.
 

Author(s): Lihua Deng, Rong Jia, Wei Li, Qian Xue, Jie Liu, Yide Miao, Jingtong Wang

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Dec;96(51):e9458.

 

Rhabdomyolysis is a well-known syndrome in clinical practice, although rhabdomyolysis caused by a liver abscess is rarely reported and the patient may lack symptoms that are associated with a primary site of infection. Early recognition of this possibility is needed to avoid diagnostic ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
Rhabdomyolysis, lactic acidosis, and multiple organ failure during telbivudine treatment for hepatitis B: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Jinxin Zheng, Minggui Deng, Xiaoliang Qiu, Zhong Chen, Duoyun Li, Xiangbin Deng, Qiwen Deng, Zhijian Yu

Journal:

 

Telbivudine can cause severe side effects, including myositis, neuritis, rhabdomyolysis, and lactic acidosis. However, reported cases of telbivudine leading to multiple organ failure are rare. Here, we report a case of telbivudine-induced severe polymyositis, lactic acidosis, and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Evaluate the Muscle Protection Effect of Sevoflurane Sedation in Vascular Surgery
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Vascular Surgery

 

Last Updated: 10 Jul 2017

Go to URL
Fatty Acid Oxidation Defects and Insulin Sensitivity
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Very Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein Deficiency; Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Normal Volunteers; Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency, Myopathic

 

Last Updated: 14 May 2018

Go to URL
Fat and Sugar Metabolism During Exercise in Patients With Metabolic Myopathy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Long-Chain 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Glycogenin-1 Deficiency (Glycogen Storage Disease Type XV); Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase 2 Deficiency; VLCAD Deficiency; Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Carnitine Transporter Deficiency; Neutral Lipid Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Muscle Phosphofructokinase Deficiency; Phosphoglucomutase 1 Deficiency; Phosphoglycerate Mutase Deficiency; Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency; Phosphorylase Kinase Deficiency; Beta Enolase Deficiency; Lactate Dehydrogenase Deficiency; Glycogen Synthase Deficiency

 

Last Updated: 31 Aug 2017

Go to URL