Satoyoshi syndrome

Common Name(s)

Satoyoshi syndrome

Satoyoshi syndrome is a rare condition characterized by progressive, painful, intermittent muscle spasms, diarrhea or unusual malabsorption, amenorrhea, alopecia universalis, short stature, and skeletal abnormalities. Progressive painful intermittent muscle spasms usually start between 6 to 15 years of age. Alopecia universalis also appears around age 10. About half of affected individuals experience malabsorption, specifically of carbohydrates. The skeletal abnormalities may be secondary to muscle spasms. The main endocrine disorder is primary amenorrhea. All cases have apparently been sporadic, even when occurring in large families. The exact cause is unknown; but some researchers have speculated that Satoyoshi syndrome is an autoimmune disorder.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Satoyoshi syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Satoyoshi syndrome" returned 4 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome with prominent laterality of clinical features.
 

Author(s): Masaki Ishihara, Katsuhiko Ogawa, Yutaka Suzuki, Satoshi Kamei, Toyoko Ochiai, Masahiro Sonoo

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2014 ;53(24):2811-6.

 

We herein report the case of a patient with adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome. Alopecia was detected on the patient's head, left leg and abdomen, with pigmentation on the left thigh and abdomen. Painful muscle spasms were also noted in the abdomen and left upper and lower extremities, ...

Last Updated: 16 Dec 2014

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[Satoyoshi syndrome: report of one case].
 

Author(s): Claudia Castiglioni, Alejandra Díaz, Karla Moënne, Verónica Mericq, Fernando Salvador, Carolina Hernández

Journal: Rev Med Chil. 2009 Apr;137(4):542-6.

 

Satoyoshi syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease of presumed autoimmune etiology characterized by progressive painful intermittent muscle spasms, diarrhea frequently associated with malabsorption, alopecia, skeletal abnormalities and endocrine disorders with a poor long-term prognosis ...

Last Updated: 22 Jul 2009

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Satoyoshi syndrome: comments.
 

Author(s): Boby M Varkey

Journal: Neurol India. 2004 Jun;52(2):271; author reply 271.

 

Last Updated: 22 Jul 2004

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Satoyoshi syndrome" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.