Secondary hemochromatosis

Common Name(s)

Secondary hemochromatosis

Secondary hemochromatosis (secondary iron overload) is a disorder caused by the body absorbing too much iron as it digests food. The excess iron is stored in several of the body’s organs and can eventually cause cancer, diabetes, irregular heartbeats (arrhythmia), and permanent scarring of the liver (cirrhosis). There are several types of hemochromatosis, and the more common types are genetic. Secondary hemochromatosis is not genetic but instead is caused by other medical conditions such as liver disease, multiple or frequent blood transfusions (usually as a treatment for another condition), kidney dialysis, thalassemia, and anemia.

Common symptoms include joint pain, fatigue, weakness, bronzed skin, diabetes, or heart failure. In men, hemochromatosis may cause loss of sex drive (low libido) and impotence. Risk factors for developing secondary hemochromatosis include a family history of diabetes, heart disease, and liver disease. Alcoholism and taking some dietary supplements (particularly high levels of vitamin C and/or iron) may also increase your risk.

For many people, the only symptom is a high level of iron in the blood, which can make forming a diagnosis challenging. Two types of blood tests may be done to diagnose the disorder. To confirm the diagnosis, other tests may include an MRI and liver biopsy. Treatments are available to manage the iron build-up. Research is ongoing, so talk with your doctor(s) about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also a good source of information and can connect you with others living with secondary hemochromatosis.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Secondary hemochromatosis" for support, advocacy or research.

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American Hemochromatosis Society, Inc.

The mission of the American Hemochromatosis Society (AHS) is to educate and support the victims of HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis (genetic iron overload) and their families as well as educate the medical community on the latest research on Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH). AHS' aim is to identify through genetic testing, the 43 million+ Americans who unknowingly carry the single or double gene mutations for HH which puts them at risk for loading excess iron.

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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Haemochromatosis Australia.

Our vision is that no Australian should suffer harm from haemochromatosis. As the primary support and advocacy group for Australians affected by haemochromatosis, we provide support and promote awareness, early diagnosis and research.

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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Iron Disorders Institute

Reducing pain, suffering and unnecessary death due to disorders of iron through awareness, education and research.

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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General Support Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Secondary hemochromatosis" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
American Hemochromatosis Society, Inc.

The mission of the American Hemochromatosis Society (AHS) is to educate and support the victims of HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis (genetic iron overload) and their families as well as educate the medical community on the latest research on Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH). AHS' aim is to identify through genetic testing, the 43 million+ Americans who unknowingly carry the single or double gene mutations for HH which puts them at risk for loading excess iron.

http://www.americanhs.org

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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Haemochromatosis Australia.

Our vision is that no Australian should suffer harm from haemochromatosis. As the primary support and advocacy group for Australians affected by haemochromatosis, we provide support and promote awareness, early diagnosis and research.

http://www.haemochromatosis.org.au

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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Iron Disorders Institute

Reducing pain, suffering and unnecessary death due to disorders of iron through awareness, education and research.

http://www.irondisorders.org

Last Updated: 13 Sep 2015

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Secondary hemochromatosis" returned 7 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Nosocomial Trichosporon asahii fungemia in a patient with secondary hemochromatosis: a rare case report.
 

Author(s): Shih-Ta Shang, Ya-Sung Yang, Ming-Yieh Peng

Journal: J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2010 Feb;43(1):77-80.

 

Trichosporon asahii (formerly known as T. beigelii) is an emerging, life-threatening opportunistic pathogen, especially in severely granulocytopenic patients with underlying hematological malignancies. Other reported predisposing factors for infection with this pathogen include organ ...

Last Updated: 3 May 2010

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Complete hematopoietic recovery after continuous iron chelation therapy in a patient with severe aplastic anemia with secondary hemochromatosis.
 

Author(s): Soo-Jeong Park, Chi-Wha Han

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2008 Apr;23(2):320-3.

 

A 16-yr-old male patient with hemochromatosis due to multiple packed red blood cell transfusions was referred to our emergency center for the treatment of severe aplastic anemia and dyspnea. He was diagnosed with aplastic anemia at 11-yr of age. He had received continuous transfusions ...

Last Updated: 25 Apr 2008

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Latent hypoparathyroidism in an osteoporotic patient with multiple endocrinopathies and secondary hemochromatosis due to multiple blood transfusions, unmasked by alendronate and glucocorticoid at adrenal crisis.
 

Author(s): Keiji Tanimoto, Yumiko Okubo, Chie Harada, Hiroshi Saito, Akira Sata, Aiko Nishikawa, Rina Ohwada, Mika Tsuiki, Masaaki Yamamoto, Etsuko Hashimoto, Kanji Sato, Kazue Takano

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2008 ;47(6):515-20.

 

A 30-year-old normocalcemic man with hypopituitarism, hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, and secondary hemochromatosis due to multiple blood transfusions was admitted because of adrenal crisis. After intravenous administration of saline and cortisol, the corrected serum level of calcium ...

Last Updated: 17 Mar 2008

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Secondary hemochromatosis" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The treatment of secondary hemochromatosis.
 

Author(s): Norbert Gattermann

Journal: Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2009 Jul;106(30):499-504, I.

 

Because secondary hemochromatosis is due to hereditary or acquired anemia, phlebotomy is not a suitable means of removing excess iron in this situation. Rather, the treatment is based on the targeted elimination of iron by means of iron chelators.

Last Updated: 3 Sep 2009

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.