Sennetsu Fever

Common Name(s)

Sennetsu Fever

Sennetsu fever or human ehrlichial infection is a rare bacterial infection caused by bacteria called Ehrlichia. Ehrlichia bacteria are transmitted through tick bites. Sennetsu fever can be a mild or a potentially life threatening disease. Symptoms usually appear within a few weeks of the tick bite and include sudden high fever, fatigue or feeling very tired, muscle pain, and headache. Other common symptoms may include chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and red eyes. Most infected children and some adults develop a skin rash. During Sennetsy fever, the bacteria may target and kill white blood cells (part of our body's immune or defense system). If this happens the person will have a weaker immune system and may also become sick with other serious infections. Sometimes the bacteria will attack liver cells causing liver damage. Treatment of this disease involves antibiotics such as doxycycline or minocycline. For those who are allergic to these two drugs, rifampin is an alternative antiobiotic. The main prevention technique is tick control. Talk with your doctor if you or your child has been diagnosed with sennetsu fever to decide on the best treatment plan.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Sennetsu Fever" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Sennetsu Fever" returned 2 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Sennetsu Neorickettsiosis, Spotted Fever Group, and Typhus Group Rickettsioses in Three Provinces in Thailand.
 

Author(s): Saithip Bhengsri, Henry C Baggett, Sophie Edouard, Scott F Dowell, Gregory A Dasch, Tami L Fisk, Didier Raoult, Philippe Parola

Journal: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.. 2016 Jul;95(1):43-9.

 

We estimated the seroprevalence and determined the frequency of acute infections with Neorickettsia sennetsu, spotted fever group rickettsiae, Rickettsia typhi, and Orientia tsutsugamushi among 2,225 febrile patients presenting to community hospitals in three rural Thailand provinces ...

Last Updated: 7 Jul 2016

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Neorickettsia sennetsu as a Neglected Cause of Fever in South-East Asia.
 

Author(s): Sabine Dittrich, Weerawat Phuklia, Gareth D H Turner, Sayaphet Rattanavong, Vilada Chansamouth, Stephen J Dumler, David J P Ferguson, Daniel H Paris, Paul N Newton

Journal:

 

Neorickettsia sennetsu infection is rarely recognized, with less than 100 globally reported patients over the last 50 years. The disease is thought to be contracted by eating raw fish, a staple of many South-East Asian cuisines. In 2009, the first patient with sennetsu was identified ...

Last Updated: 10 Jul 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Sennetsu Fever" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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