Spasmodic dysphonia

Common Name(s)

Spasmodic dysphonia

Spasmodic dysphonia is a voice disorder caused by involuntary movements of one or more muscles of the larynx or voice box. Individuals who have spasmodic dysphonia may have occasional difficulty saying a word or two or they may experience sufficient difficulty to interfere with communication. Spasmodic dysphonia causes the voice to break or to have a tight, strained or strangled quality. While the cause of spasmodic dysphonia is unknown, most cases are believed to be neurogenic (having to do with the nervous system) in nature. Some cases occur along with movement disorders and some may be inherited. While anyone can be affected, spasmodic dysphonia more often affects women and begins in those between the ages of 30 and 50.  

There are three different types of spasmodic dysphonia:  

Adductor spasmodic dysphonia (causes the vocal cords to slam together and stiffen) Abductor spasmodic dysphonia (causes the vocal cords to open)  Mixed spasmodic dysphonia (causes the vocal cords to open and close)
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Spasmodic dysphonia" for support, advocacy or research.

National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association

The mission of the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association is to advance medical research into the causes of and treatments for spasmodic dysphonia, promote physician and public awareness of the disorder, and provide support to those affected by spasmodic dysphonia.

Last Updated: 9 Nov 2012

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General Support Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Spasmodic dysphonia" for support, advocacy or research.

National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association

The mission of the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association is to advance medical research into the causes of and treatments for spasmodic dysphonia, promote physician and public awareness of the disorder, and provide support to those affected by spasmodic dysphonia.

http://www.dysphonia.org/

Last Updated: 9 Nov 2012

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Spasmodic dysphonia" returned 35 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Phenotype- and genotype-specific structural alterations in spasmodic dysphonia.
 

Author(s): Serena Bianchi, Giovanni Battistella, Hailey Huddleston, Rebecca Scharf, Lazar Fleysher, Anna F Rumbach, Steven J Frucht, Andrew Blitzer, Laurie J Ozelius, Kristina Simonyan

Journal: Mov. Disord.. 2017 04;32(4):560-568.

 

Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles that occur selectively during speaking. Although hereditary trends have been reported in up to 16% of patients, the causative etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear, and the influences ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Cortical sensorimotor alterations classify clinical phenotype and putative genotype of spasmodic dysphonia.
 

Author(s): G Battistella, S Fuertinger, L Fleysher, L J Ozelius, K Simonyan

Journal: Eur. J. Neurol.. 2016 10;23(10):1517-27.

 

Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), or laryngeal dystonia, is a task-specific isolated focal dystonia of unknown causes and pathophysiology. Although functional and structural abnormalities have been described in this disorder, the influence of its different clinical phenotypes and genotypes ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Dystonia-Causing Mutations as a Contribution to the Etiology of Spasmodic Dysphonia.
 

Author(s): Claudio M de Gusmão, Tania Fuchs, Andrew Moses, Trisha Multhaupt-Buell, Phillip C Song, Laurie J Ozelius, Ramon A Franco, Nutan Sharma

Journal: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2016 10;155(4):624-8.

 

Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia of the larynx with heterogeneous manifestations and association with familial risk factors. There are scarce data to allow precise understanding of etiology and pathophysiology. Screening for dystonia-causing genetic mutations has the potential ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Spasmodic dysphonia" returned 4 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Spasmodic dysphonia: a laryngeal control disorder specific to speech.
 

Author(s): Christy L Ludlow

Journal: J. Neurosci.. 2011 Jan;31(3):793-7.

 

Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a rare neurological disorder that emerges in middle age, is usually sporadic, and affects intrinsic laryngeal muscle control only during speech. Spasmodic bursts in particular laryngeal muscles disrupt voluntary control during vowel sounds in adductor SD ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Treatment for spasmodic dysphonia: limitations of current approaches.
 

Author(s): Christy L Ludlow

Journal: Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Jun;17(3):160-5.

 

Although botulinum toxin injection is the gold standard for treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, surgical approaches aimed at providing long-term symptom control have been advancing over recent years.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Research priorities in spasmodic dysphonia.
 

Author(s): Christy L Ludlow, Charles H Adler, Gerald S Berke, Steven A Bielamowicz, Andrew Blitzer, Susan B Bressman, Mark Hallett, H A Jinnah, Uwe Juergens, Sandra B Martin, Joel S Perlmutter, Christine Sapienza, Andrew Singleton, Caroline M Tanner, Gayle E Woodson

Journal: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;139(4):495-505.

 

To identify research priorities to increase understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and improved treatment of spasmodic dysphonia.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Imaging Genetics of Spasmodic Dysphonia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Spasmodic Dysphonia

 

Last Updated: 2 Jan 2018

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Effects of Vocal Exercises for Spasmodic Dysphonia
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia

 

Last Updated: 17 Nov 2017

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Sodium Oxybate in Spasmodic Dysphonia and Voice Tremor
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Spasmodic Dysphonia; Voice Tremor; Vocal Fold Nodules

 

Last Updated: 2 Jan 2018

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