Swyer James syndrome

Common Name(s)

Swyer James syndrome

Swyer-James syndrome is a rare condition in which the lung (or portion of the lung) does not grow normally and is slightly smaller than the opposite lung, usually following bronchiolitis in childhood. It is typically diagnosed after a chest X-ray or CT scan which shows unilateral pulmonary hyperlucency (one lung appearing less dense) and diminished pulmonary arteries.  Affected individuals may not have any symptoms, or more commonly, they may have recurrent pulmonary infections and common respiratory symptoms. The cause of the condition is not completely understood.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Swyer James syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Swyer James syndrome" returned 23 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Swyer-James-Macleod syndrome: a rare finding and important differential in the ED setting.
 

Author(s): Benjamin Chaucer, Marie Chevenon, Cloty Toro, Teresa Lemma, Melissa Grageda

Journal: Am J Emerg Med. 2016 Jul;34(7):1329.e3-4.

 

Last Updated: 28 Jun 2016

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Complication of post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (Swyer-James syndrome).
 

Author(s): Gabriel de Deus Vieira, Alessandra Yukari Yamagishi, Natália Nogueira Vieira, Rebeka Mayara Miranda Dias Fogaça, Thaianne da Cunha Alves, Gisele Megale Brandão Gurgel Amaral, Camila Maciel de Sousa

Journal: Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992). ;61(5):404-6.

 

Swyer-James syndrome is a complication of post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans that causes inflammation and fibrosis of the bronchial walls. There are two types: asymptomatic, with most cases diagnosed in adults during routine radiological examinations; and symptomatic, most commonly ...

Last Updated: 25 Nov 2015

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Unilateral hyperlucent lung associated with bronchial atresia mimicking Swyer-James syndrome.
 

Author(s): Masaru Ando, Eishi Miyazaki, Hideaki Fujisaki, Shin-ichi Nureki, Jun-ichi Kadota

Journal: Respir Care. 2014 Nov;59(11):e182-5.

 

Last Updated: 31 Oct 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Swyer James syndrome" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

VATS bullectomy and apical pleurectomy for spontaneous pneumothorax in a young patient with Swyer-James-Mc Leod syndrome: case report presentation and literature review focusing on surgically treated cases.
 

Author(s): Nikolaos Panagopoulos, Gerasimos Papavasileiou, Efstratios Koletsis, Myrto Kastanaki, Nikolaos Anastasiou

Journal:

 

Swyer-James-McLeod Syndrome (SJMS) is an uncommon, emphysematous disease characterized by radiologic hyperlucency of pulmonary parenchyma due to loss of the pulmonary vascular structure and to alveolar overdistension.

Last Updated: 21 Jan 2014

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.