Apical ballooning syndrome

Common Name(s)

Apical ballooning syndrome, Broken heart syndrome, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

Apical ballooning syndrome, also known as broken heart syndrome, is a condition that occurs when a person suddenly feels a great deal of stress. The stress causes one to feel chest pains or feel like they are having a heart attack. In apical ballooning syndrome, your heart’s regular pumping function is disturbed, but the rest of your heart functions normally, and may even be contracting more forcefully than normal.

The symptoms of the syndrome are chest pain and shortness of breath. Women experience apical ballooning syndrome much more often than men. Age also increases your risk of the syndrome. Most people with the syndrome are women over the age of 50. Common causes of the stress include learning about the death of a loved one, losing a large sum of money, natural disasters, a surprise party, public speaking, job loss, and divorce. Common physical stressors include asthma attacks, car accidents, and surgery.

In order to diagnose the syndrome, your doctor will ask you about your health history and perform a physical exam. They may also test the electrical impulses in your heart, take blood samples, and perform special imaging studies of your heart. Coronary angiograms are also helpful to determine if the cause of pain was apical ballooning syndrome or a heart attack. In this test, a dye is injected into your heart to see if there are any blockages in the blood vessels. Your doctor may give you some medication so that your heart does not have to work as hard as usual while you recover. Research is ongoing, so talk with your cardiologist and doctor about the most current treatment and management options. Support groups are a good source of information and can help connect you with others living with apical ballooning syndrome.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Apical ballooning syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Apical ballooning syndrome" returned 49 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Transesophageal echo diagnosis of perioperative unusual transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome.
 

Author(s): Hugo Andr S Mantilla, Felix Ramón Montes, William F Amaya

Journal: Ann Card Anaesth. ;19(4):733-736.

 

Stress cardiomyopathy, or Takotsubo syndrome, is a widely recognized cardiac pathology with a clinical presentation similar to acute coronary syndrome and related to physical or emotional stress. Perioperatively, it is challenging to identify it given the variety of forms and scenarios ...

Last Updated: 7 Oct 2016

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Last Updated: 22 May 2014

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Two cases of apical ballooning syndrome masking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
 

Author(s): Ranjini Raina Roy, Fayaz A Hakim, R Todd Hurst, David Simper, Christopher P Appleton

Journal:

 

Apical akinesis and dilation in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a typical feature of stress-induced (takotsubo) cardiomyopathy, whereas apical hypertrophy is seen in apical-variant hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report the cases of 2 patients who presented with ...

Last Updated: 8 May 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Apical ballooning syndrome" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Transient left ventricular apical ballooning (Tako-tsubo): the syndrome that mimics acute myocardial infarction.
 

Author(s): Azrial Osherov, Shlomi Matetzky, Roy Beinart, Hanoch Hod

Journal: Isr. Med. Assoc. J.. 2004 Sep;6(9):550-2.

 

Last Updated: 17 Sep 2004

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Brain fMRT In Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

 

Last Updated: 29 Sep 2016

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Adenosin to Rapidly Reverse Left Ventricle Impairment in Takotsubo Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy; Takotsubo Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 13 Aug 2016

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