Tick paralysis

Common Name(s)

Tick paralysis

Tick paralysis occurs when a female tick releases venom or toxin into a person's bloodstream, causing temporary paralysis. Cases of tick paralysis are most often seen in children. Symptoms start to show about 4-7 days after the tick bites and usually begin with loss of feeling and movement in the legs. The paralysis then progresses upward to the child's trunk and arms. Vision problems and trouble swallowing also occur. Eventually the paralysis will cause breathing difficulties. Tick paralysis is cured by removing the tick. Recovery is usually rapid.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Tick paralysis" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Tick paralysis" returned 16 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A Case of Subacute Ataxia in the Summertime: Tick Paralysis.
 

Author(s): Christin B Laufer, Nicole Chiota-McCollum

Journal: J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Aug;30(8):1225-7.

 

Tick paralysis is caused by a neurotoxin secreted in the saliva of a gravid female tick, and manifests with ataxia, areflexia, ascending paralysis, bulbar palsy, and ophthalmoparesis. An 84-year-old man presented in June in coastal Mississippi with several days of subacute ataxia, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Facial nerve paralysis due to intra-aural Hyalomma tick infestation.
 

Author(s): Müzeyyen Doğan, Cem Devge, Ozlem Tanrıöver, Yavuz Selim Pata, Meral Sönmezoğlu

Journal: Turkiye Parazitol Derg. 2012 ;36(4):254-7.

 

We present the case of a 33 year-old man from a village of the north-eastern part of central Anatolia admitted to the otolaryngology department of Yeditepe University Hospital with right facial asymmetry and pain on the right ear. A tick of the genus Hyalomma was observed in the external ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Tick paralysis cases in Argentina.
 

Author(s): Carlos Remondegui

Journal: Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop.. ;45(4):533-4.

 

Tick paralysis (TP) occurs worldwide and is caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks that affects the peripheral and central nervous system. The clinical manifestations range from mild or nonspecific symptoms to manifestations similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome, bulbar ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Tick paralysis" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Tick paralysis in Australia caused by Ixodes holocyclus Neumann.
 

Author(s): S Hall-Mendelin, S B Craig, R A Hall, P O'Donoghue, R B Atwell, S M Tulsiani, G C Graham

Journal: Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 2011 Mar;105(2):95-106.

 

Ticks are obligate haematophagous ectoparasites of various animals, including humans, and are abundant in temperate and tropical zones around the world. They are the most important vectors for the pathogens causing disease in livestock and second only to mosquitoes as vectors of pathogens ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A 60-year meta-analysis of tick paralysis in the United States: a predictable, preventable, and often misdiagnosed poisoning.
 

Author(s): James Henry Diaz

Journal: J Med Toxicol. 2010 Mar;6(1):15-21.

 

Tick paralysis (TP) is a neurotoxic poisoning primarily afflicting young girls in endemic regions. Recent case series of TP have described increasing misdiagnoses of TP as the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A meta-analysis of the scientific literature was conducted using Internet ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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