Traumatic brain injury

Common Name(s)

Traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by a blow to the head or jolt to the head or body. It can also be caused by an object going through the skull, like a bullet or even a shattered piece of the skull bone.

Mild TBI is commonly known as a concussion. Common concussion symptoms include a loss of consciousness, being in a confused or dazed state, and headaches. More physical issues may include: sleep issues (either sleeping too much or difficultly sleeping), nausea, or dizziness. People with concussions also experience problems with their senses, memory and concentration. All of these symptoms are also present in more severe brain trauma. However, for severe cases, additional physical symptoms may include seizures, long lasting nausea or vomiting, widened (dilated) pupils, not being able to wake up, or loss of coordination. Other mental symptoms include confusion, slurred speech, and unusual behavior. Babies with brain trauma may experience changes in eating/nursing and persistent crying.

If you recently experienced a fall, car/motorcycle accident, violence, or a sports injury, it is possible that you have a TBI. People are most likely to have a traumatic brain injury between the ages 0-4, 15-24, and 75+.

Doctors can diagnose brain trauma by testing a person’s ability to follow direction and their ability to control different body parts (Glasgow Coma Scale). Brain scans, such as CT scans or MRIs, may also be taken so that the doctor can see if the brain or skull is damaged. Mild brain trauma may be treated by resting and over-the-counter pain medication. However, more severe traumas may require prescribed medication, surgery, or rehabilitation. Individuals with brain trauma will not have all the listed symptoms. If you or your child has been diagnosed with TBI, talk to your doctor and specialists about current treatment options. Support groups are a good resource of information especially for those with more severe TBI.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Traumatic brain injury" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Traumatic brain injury" returned 1961 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Aggravation of an injured dentato-rubro-thalamic tract in a patient with mild traumatic brain injury: A case report.
 

Author(s): Sung Ho Jang, Hyeok Gyu Kwon

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Oct;96(43):e8253.

 

We report on a patient with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) by follow-up diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), and observed for approximately nine monthsby serial diffusion tensor tractography (DTT).

Last Updated: 25 Oct 2017

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Evaluation of novel computerized tomography scoring systems in human traumatic brain injury: An observational, multicenter study.
 

Author(s): Eric Peter Thelin, David W Nelson, Juho Vehviläinen, Harriet Nyström, Riku Kivisaari, Jari Siironen, Mikael Svensson, Markus B Skrifvars, Bo-Michael Bellander, Rahul Raj

Journal:

 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning of the brain is essential for diagnostic screening of intracranial injuries in need of neurosurgical intervention, but may also provide information concerning patient ...

Last Updated: 3 Aug 2017

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Successful ceftazidime-avibactam treatment of MDR-KPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a patient with traumatic brain injury: A case report.
 

Author(s): Agnese Gugliandolo, Carla Caio, Maria Lina Mezzatesta, Carmela Rifici, Placido Bramanti, Stefania Stefani, Emanuela Mazzon

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Aug;96(31):e7664.

 

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections are a serious health care problem, because of the high mortality. Carbapenem resistance is mainly caused by carbapenemases production, including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC). Ceftazidime-avibactam is a new cephalosporin/β-lactamase ...

Last Updated: 2 Aug 2017

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Traumatic brain injury" returned 384 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Traumatic brain injury may not increase the risk of Alzheimer disease.
 

Author(s): Michael W Weiner, Paul K Crane, Thomas J Montine, David A Bennett, Dallas P Veitch

Journal: Neurology. 2017 Oct;89(18):1923-1925.

 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly occurs in civilian and military populations. Some epidemiologic studies previously have associated TBI with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent clinicopathologic and biomarker studies have failed to confirm the relationship of ...

Last Updated: 5 Oct 2017

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The screening and management of pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury in adults: British Neurotrauma Group guidance.
 

Author(s): Chin Lik Tan, Seyed Alireza Alavi, Stephanie E Baldeweg, Antonio Belli, Alan Carson, Claire Feeney, Anthony P Goldstone, Richard Greenwood, David K Menon, Helen L Simpson, Andrew A Toogood, Mark Gurnell, Peter J Hutchinson

Journal: J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry. 2017 Nov;88(11):971-981.

 

Pituitary dysfunction is a recognised, but potentially underdiagnosed complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Post-traumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) can have major consequences for patients physically, psychologically, emotionally and socially, leading to reduced quality of life, ...

Last Updated: 1 Sep 2017

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) and chronic cognitive impairment: A scoping review.
 

Author(s): Kerry McInnes, Christopher L Friesen, Diane E MacKenzie, David A Westwood, Shaun G Boe

Journal:

 

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion, is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. With mTBI comes symptoms that include headaches, fatigue, depression, anxiety and irritability, as well as impaired cognitive function. Symptom resolution is thought to occur within ...

Last Updated: 11 Apr 2017

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 26 May 2017

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Long Term Effects of Erythropoietin in Patients With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2017

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Last Updated: 26 Sep 2016

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