Traumatic brain injury

Common Name(s)

Traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by a blow to the head or jolt to the head or body. It can also be caused by an object going through the skull, like a bullet or even a shattered piece of the skull bone.

Mild TBI is commonly known as a concussion. Common concussion symptoms include a loss of consciousness, being in a confused or dazed state, and headaches. More physical issues may include: sleep issues (either sleeping too much or difficultly sleeping), nausea, or dizziness. People with concussions also experience problems with their senses, memory and concentration. All of these symptoms are also present in more severe brain trauma. However, for severe cases, additional physical symptoms may include seizures, long lasting nausea or vomiting, widened (dilated) pupils, not being able to wake up, or loss of coordination. Other mental symptoms include confusion, slurred speech, and unusual behavior. Babies with brain trauma may experience changes in eating/nursing and persistent crying.

If you recently experienced a fall, car/motorcycle accident, violence, or a sports injury, it is possible that you have a TBI. People are most likely to have a traumatic brain injury between the ages 0-4, 15-24, and 75+.

Doctors can diagnose brain trauma by testing a person’s ability to follow direction and their ability to control different body parts (Glasgow Coma Scale). Brain scans, such as CT scans or MRIs, may also be taken so that the doctor can see if the brain or skull is damaged. Mild brain trauma may be treated by resting and over-the-counter pain medication. However, more severe traumas may require prescribed medication, surgery, or rehabilitation. Individuals with brain trauma will not have all the listed symptoms. If you or your child has been diagnosed with TBI, talk to your doctor and specialists about current treatment options. Support groups are a good resource of information especially for those with more severe TBI.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Traumatic brain injury" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Traumatic brain injury" returned 2188 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Verbal auditory agnosia in a patient with traumatic brain injury: A case report.
 

Author(s): Jong Min Kim, Seung Beom Woo, Zeeihn Lee, Sung Jae Heo, Donghwi Park

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Mar;97(11):e0136.

 

Verbal auditory agnosia is the selective inability to recognize verbal sounds. Patients with this disorder lose the ability to understand language, write from dictation, and repeat words with reserved ability to identify nonverbal sounds. However, to the best of our knowledge, there ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Recombinant human erythropoietin for treating severe traumatic brain injury.
 

Author(s): Xiao-Fei Bai, Yong-Kai Gao

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jan;97(1):e9532.

 

This study aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHE) for the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury (STBI).

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Early measurement of interleukin-10 predicts the absence of CT scan lesions in mild traumatic brain injury.
 

Author(s): Linnéa Lagerstedt, Juan José Egea-Guerrero, Ana Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Alejandro Bustamante, Joan Montaner, Amir El Rahal, Elisabeth Andereggen, Lara Rinaldi, Asita Sarrafzadeh, Karl Schaller, Jean-Charles Sanchez

Journal:

 

Traumatic brain injury is a common event where 70%-90% will be classified as mild TBI (mTBI). Among these, only 10% will have a brain lesion visible via CT scan. A triage biomarker would help clinicians to identify patients with mTBI who are at risk of developing a brain lesion and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Traumatic brain injury" returned 430 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Investigating nystagmus in patients with traumatic brain injury: A systematic review (1996 - 2016).
 

Author(s): H De Clercq, A Naude, J Bornman

Journal:

 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a health and socioeconomic concern worldwide. In patients with TBI, post-traumatic balance problems are often the result of damage to the vestibular system. Nystagmus is common in these patients, and can provide insight into the damage that has resulted ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Traumatic brain injury may not increase the risk of Alzheimer disease.
 

Author(s): Michael W Weiner, Paul K Crane, Thomas J Montine, David A Bennett, Dallas P Veitch

Journal: Neurology. 2017 Oct;89(18):1923-1925.

 

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly occurs in civilian and military populations. Some epidemiologic studies previously have associated TBI with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent clinicopathologic and biomarker studies have failed to confirm the relationship of ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Repeated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Potential Mechanisms of Damage.
 

Author(s): Brooke Fehily, Melinda Fitzgerald

Journal: Cell Transplant. 2017 Jul;26(7):1131-1155.

 

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a significant public healthcare concern, accounting for the majority of all head injuries. While symptoms are generally transient, some patients go on to experience long-term cognitive impairments and additional mild impacts can result ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Imaging of Traumatic Brain Injury Metabolism Using Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 Pyruvate
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Last Updated: 23 Apr 2018

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Long Term Effects of Erythropoietin in Patients With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Last Updated: 17 Aug 2017

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Last Updated: 26 May 2017

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