Tricuspid atresia

Common Name(s)

Tricuspid atresia

Tricuspid atresia is a heart defect that is present at birth. The tricuspid valve is one of four heart valves which ensure that blood flows in the correct direction at the correct time. The tricuspid valve connects the right upper chamber (atrium) to the right lower chamber (ventricle) of the heart. Individuals with tricuspid atresia have solid tissue where the valve should be, which prevents blood from passing through. This leads to an absent or undersized right ventricle. Blood can no longer flow from the right ventricle into the lungs to be oxygenated. Instead, blood flows through holes in the heart walls that should normally close after birth. This abnormal movement of blood is less effective than normal movement of blood through the heart, and babies who are born with this defect require surgery.

Symptoms of tricuspid atresia include tiring easily, blue-tinted skin (cyanosis), shortness of breath, and poor growth. These symptoms are usually visible shortly after birth. Additional symptoms include swelling of the legs, arms, feet, or abdomen. A doctor may notice a swishing sound when listening to the heart (murmur) or a rapid heartbeat. Individuals who have Down syndrome are at an increased risk of having tricuspid atresia. The risk of tricuspid atresia also increases if the mother is infected with rubella, drinks alcohol, or has uncontrolled diabetes during pregnancy.

A diagnosis of tricuspid atresia can be made prior to birth with an ultrasound. Once the baby is born, an echocardiogram is usually performed to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment will usually involve at least one surgery to ensure that the heart is able to pump adequate amounts of oxygenated blood to the body. Continued follow-up and medications are also important to prevent any complications. Talk to your child’s doctor about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also available for more information.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Tricuspid atresia" for support, advocacy or research.

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Tricuspid atresia" returned 95 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Evaluation of the anatomic and hemodynamic abnormalities in tricuspid atresia before and after surgery using computational fluid dynamics.
 

Author(s): Li-Jun Chen, Yu-Qi Zhang, Zhi-Rong Tong, Ai-Min Sun

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jan;97(2):e9510.

 

Analysis of hemodynamics inside tricuspid atresia (TA) chamber is essential to the understanding of TA for optimal treatment. In this study, we introduced a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) to study the diastolic flow changes ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Outcomes After Decompression of the Right Ventricle in Infants With Pulmonary Atresia With Intact Ventricular Septum Are Associated With Degree of Tricuspid Regurgitation: Results From the Congenital Catheterization Research Collaborative.
 

Author(s): Christopher J Petit, Andrew C Glatz, Athar M Qureshi, Ritu Sachdeva, Shiraz A Maskatia, Henri Justino, David J Goldberg, Namrita Mozumdar, Wendy Whiteside, Lindsay S Rogers, George T Nicholson, Courtney McCracken, Mike Kelleman, Bryan H Goldstein

Journal: Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2017 May;10(5):.

 

Outcomes after right ventricle (RV) decompression in infants with pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum vary widely. Descriptions of outcomes are limited to small single-center studies.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Aortopathy in an Adult With Tricuspid Atresia and Left Ventricular Non-Compaction After Fontan Procedure.
 

Author(s): Tomotaka Murakami, Yoshiki Mori, Nao Inoue, Sachie Kaneko, Yasumi Nakashima

Journal: Circ. J.. 2017 10;81(11):1745-1746.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Tricuspid atresia" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Parental Refusal of Surgery in an Infant With Tricuspid Atresia.
 

Author(s): Alexander A Kon, Angira Patel, Steven Leuthner, John D Lantos

Journal: Pediatrics. 2016 Nov;138(5):.

 

We present a case of a fetal diagnosis of tricuspid atresia (TA). The pregnant woman and her husband requested that the baby be treated with only palliative care. The cardiologist did not think it would be appropriate to withhold life-prolonging surgery once the infant was born. The ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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