Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

Common Name(s)

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern, Ventricular familial preexcitation syndrome

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is a rare condition where there is an extra electrical pathway in the heart. WPW can be caused by a gene mutation or it can be a form of congenital heart disease, most commonly an Ebstein's anomaly. The human heart has four chambers. The two upper chambers are called atria and the two lower chambers are called ventricles. A heart that beats normally receives an electrical signal that moves from the atria to the ventricles. In WPW, an extra electrical signal pathway acts like a shortcut so that the signal arrives too early to the ventricle, which may cause a very fast heartbeat (tachycardia). This event is also called paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PVST). The extra electrical pathway is present at birth (congenital) but symptoms usually appear between the ages of 11 and 50. Some people with WPW never have any symptoms.

The symptoms of WPW are caused by the rapid heartbeat and may vary greatly in severity. Symptoms may include fluttering or pounding heartbeats (palpitations), dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and anxiety. Episodes of rapid heart rate, known to last anywhere from a few seconds to several hours, are often caused by exercise, caffeine, or alcohol. More serious symptoms include chest pain, chest tightness, difficulty breathing and in rare cases, cardiac arrest.

A diagnosis can be made by using blood tests, chest X-rays, or an electrocardiogram (where sensors are placed on your body to measure the electrical signals). Some people with WPW do not need treatment. Treatment may include using several body movements to help lower heart rate if an episode occurs. For those with more serious WPW, medications and a special heart therapy are available. Research is ongoing, so talk to your cardiologist (heart doctor) about the most current treatment options. Support groups are also a good source of information and can connect you with others living with heart arrhythmias.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

Kids with Heart National Association for Children's Heart Disorders

Our organization was formed in 1985 with the main mission of providing support, information, resources, and education for the families of the children living with congenital heart defects and to promote public awareness of the issues that these families live with on a day to day basis.

Last Updated: 4 May 2015

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SADS (Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes) Foundation

Our mission is to save the lives of young people who are genetically predisposed to sudden death due to cardiac arrhythmia and to provide education and support to families and the medical community.

Last Updated: 23 Apr 2015

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General Support Organizations

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

Kids with Heart National Association for Children's Heart Disorders

Our organization was formed in 1985 with the main mission of providing support, information, resources, and education for the families of the children living with congenital heart defects and to promote public awareness of the issues that these families live with on a day to day basis.

http://www.kidswithheart.org

Last Updated: 4 May 2015

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SADS (Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes) Foundation

Our mission is to save the lives of young people who are genetically predisposed to sudden death due to cardiac arrhythmia and to provide education and support to families and the medical community.

http://www.StopSADS.org

Last Updated: 23 Apr 2015

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General Support Organizations

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General Resources

SADS Foundation Website

Information on living with SADS, diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and advocacy/education.

Updated 29 Apr 2014

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome" returned 230 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and noncompaction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to the variant m.3460G>A.
 

Author(s): Josef Finsterer, Claudia Stollberger, Edmund Gatterer

Journal: J. Int. Med. Res.. 2018 May;46(5):2054-2060.

 

This report describes a 66-year-old Caucasian male who acutely developed severe, bilateral impairment of visual acuity at 24 years of age. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was suspected but the diagnosis was not genetically confirmed until the age of 49 years when the primary ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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A Case of Multiple Cardiovascular and Tracheal Anomalies Presented with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in a Middle-aged Adult.
 

Author(s): Hyejin Shi, Sungmin Sohn, SungHo Wang, Sungrock Park, SangKi Lee, Song Yi Kim, Sun Young Jeong, Changhwan Kim

Journal: J. Korean Med. Sci.. 2017 Dec;32(12):2069-2072.

 

Congenital cardiovascular anomalies, such as dextrocardia, persistent left superior vena cava (SVC), and pulmonary artery (PA) sling, are rare disorders. These congenital anomalies can occur alone, or coincide with other congenital malformations. In the majority of cases, congenital ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Localization Of Accessory Pathway In Patients With Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome From Surface Ecg Using Arruda Algorithm.
 

Author(s): Shahab Saidullah, Bakhtawar Shah, Hameed Ullah, Zahid Aslam, Muhammad Aleem Khan

Journal: J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad. ;28(3):441-444.

 

To ablate accessory pathway successfully and conveniently, accurate localization of the pathway is needed. Electrophysiologists use different algorithms before taking the patients to the electrophysiology (EP) laboratory to plan the intervention accordingly. In this study, we used ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: incidental ECG diagnosis and a review of literature regarding current treatment.
 

Author(s): Alexander Liu, Pawan Pusalkar

Journal:

 

A 19-year-old male presented with periorbital cellulitis responsive to intravenous antibiotics. A routine ECG on admission showed slurred upstroke of the QRS complexes consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). He has never experienced any cardiac-related symptoms. Once ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Mutation of mitochondrial DNA G13513A presenting with Leigh syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and cardiomyopathy.
 

Author(s): Shi-Bing Wang, Wen-Chin Weng, Ni-Chung Lee, Wuh-Liang Hwu, Pi-Chuan Fan, Wang-Tso Lee

Journal: Pediatr Neonatol. 2008 Aug;49(4):145-9.

 

Mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) G13513A, encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I, can cause mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and Leigh syndrome. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and optic atrophy were reported ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Electrocardiographic features of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
 

Author(s): L Keating, F P Morris, W J Brady

Journal: Emerg Med J. 2003 Sep;20(5):491-3.

 

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is not uncommon in the emergency department. Its early recognition and initial treatment allows rapid restoration to sinus rhythm. Prompt referral to cardiology is essential for risk stratification through electrophysiological studies.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Risk Assessment in Patients With Symptomatic- and Asymptomatic Preexcitation
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 29 Sep 2017

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