Yellow nail syndrome

Common Name(s)

Yellow nail syndrome

Yellow nail syndrome is characterized by yellow nails that lack a cuticle, grow slowly, and are loose or detached (onycholysis). Yellow nail syndrome is often associated with diseases of the lung or lymphedema.   Yellow nail syndrome often affects older adults, though it can occur at any age.   While the exact cause of this condition is unknown, it has been shown to run in some families, which suggests that there may be a genetic component in some cases.   Unfortunately, there is no cure for this condition, but there are therapies available to treat the related lung diseases and lymphedema.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Yellow nail syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Yellow nail syndrome" returned 36 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Yellow Nail Syndrome.
 

Author(s): Shricharith Shetty, Nalini Bhaskaranand

Journal: Indian Pediatr. 2016 Dec;53(12):1133.

 

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Titanium Dioxide in Toothpaste Causing Yellow Nail Syndrome.
 

Author(s): Ting-Yuan Hsu, Chun-Chen Lin, Ming-Dar Lee, Brian Pin-Hsuan Chang, Jeng-Daw Tsai

Journal: Pediatrics. 2017 Jan;139(1):.

 

Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is an uncommon disorder, the classic triad of which consists of yellow nails, lymphedema, and respiratory symptoms. Few pediatric cases have been reported. We report a 9-year-old girl with yellowish nail discoloration for 1 year accompanied by respiratory ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Thoracoscopy under Local Anesthesia was Useful for Diagnosing Yellow Nail Syndrome.
 

Author(s): Shoki Ro, Satoru Ishii, Yukie Hayashi, Konomi Kobayashi, Haruna Masaki, Shion Miyoshi, Yuichiro Takeda, Masayuki Hojo, Haruhito Sugiyama

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2016 ;55(8):975-80.

 

An 80-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis and a past history of tuberculosis presented with exertional dyspnea and edema of both legs. Chest X-ray performed on admission showed bilateral pleural effusion. Thoracoscopy under local anesthesia was performed, and vasodilation and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Yellow nail syndrome" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Yellow nail syndrome: a review.
 

Author(s): Stéphane Vignes, Robert Baran

Journal:

 

Yellow nail syndrome (YNS; OMIM 153300, ORPHA662) is a very rare disorder that almost always occurs after 50 years of age but a juvenile or familial form has also been observed. YNS is diagnosed based on a triad associating yellow nail discoloration, pulmonary manifestations (chronic ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Characteristics of patients with yellow nail syndrome and pleural effusion.
 

Author(s): Luis Valdés, John T Huggins, Francisco Gude, Lucía Ferreiro, José M Alvarez-Dobaño, Antonio Golpe, María E Toubes, Francisco J González-Barcala, Esther San José, Steven A Sahn

Journal: Respirology. 2014 Oct;19(7):985-92.

 

Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) can be associated with a pleural effusion (PE) but the characteristics of these patients are not well defined. We performed a systematic review across four electronic databases for studies reporting clinical findings, PE characteristics, and most effective ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Yellow nail syndrome.
 

Author(s): A Hershko, B Hirshberg, M Nahir, G Friedman

Journal: Postgrad Med J. 1997 Aug;73(862):466-8.

 

The yellow nail syndrome was defined as a clinical entity in the 1960s. Although nail abnormalities were the first sign to be noticed, this syndrome is now known to involve multiple organ systems and its association with other diseases is well described. A review of the medical literature ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.